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I am using aeson library for generating and parsing json-files for my custom Graph type. Here are type definitions.

type Id = Int
type Edge = (Id, Id)
type Scenario = [Id]
data Point = Point Int Int
data Vertex = Vertex {-# UNPACK #-}!Id {-# UNPACK #-}!Point deriving (Show)
data Graph = Graph Id [Vertex] Scenario deriving (Show)

Actually I am working with Eulerian and semi-Eulerian graphs, all vertices of which have positions in 2D-space. In a nutshell Graph uses Data.Graph, but this is not related to my problem. Every graph has it's own ID to quickly identify it among many others.

Here is an example of json-file, containing info about my graph:

{
    "id": 1,
    "vertices": {
        "3": {
            "y": 12,
            "x": 0
        },
        "2": {
            "y": 16,
            "x": 24
        },
        "1": {
            "y": 12,
            "x": 10
        }
    },
    "scenario": [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        1
    ]
}

So, here is my implementation of toJSON function:

import qualified Data.Text                     as T

instance ToJSON Graph where
  toJSON (Graph id v s) = object [ "vertices" .= object (map vertexToPair v)
                                 , "scenario" .= s
                                 , "id" .= id
                                 ]
    where
      vertexToPair :: Vertex -> (T.Text, Value)
      vertexToPair (Vertex id (Point x y)) =
        (T.pack $ show id) .= object [ "x" .= x, "y" .= y]

But I actually have a problem with parsing back from json-file. The main problem is the fact, that we don't know how much vertices has particular Graph, so it can't be hard-coded. Here is my first attempt to write parseJSON function:

instance FromJSON Graph where
  parseJSON (Object v) = do
    i <- parseJSON =<< v .: "id"
    vs <- parseJSON =<< v .: "vertices"
    sc <- parseJSON =<< v .: "scenario"
    maybeReturn ((buildGraph i sc) <$> (parseVertices vs 1))
      where
        parseVertices :: Value -> Int -> Maybe [Vertex]
        -- parseVertices (Object o) i = ???
        parseVertices _ _ = Just []

        buildGraph :: Int -> Scenario -> [Vertex] -> Graph
        buildGraph i sc vertices = Graph i vertices sc

        maybeReturn Nothing = mzero
        maybeReturn (Just x) = return x
  parseJSON _ = mzero

Actually I thought that I can start counting from 1 and get vertices while program still parses every next i. But this is not good choice because minimal vertex id is not always 1, and sometimes next vertex id differs from current by more then 1. Is it even possible to parse such data? Anyway, I stuck even with a simplest case of this problem (when vertex ids start from 1 and are incremented using (+1)).

Alright. This is how I can get max and min vertex id:

import qualified Data.Text.Read                as TR
import qualified Data.Foldable                 as Foldable

minID :: [Either T.Text Int] -> Int
minID = Foldable.maximum

maxID :: [Either T.Text Int] -> Int
maxID = Foldable.minimum

ids :: Object -> [Either T.Text Int]
ids o = map ((fmap fst) . TR.decimal) (M.keys o)

All signatures are not generalised, but this is just example.

I will try tomorrow once again to solve this simple case of problem. Anyway, main question still needs an answer :)

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to know the vertex indices before parsing them? Wouldn't simply defining a FromJSON instance for the vertexes that reads the indices be enough? –  duplode Mar 28 '14 at 11:36
    
Oh. My bad. This is not index but ID :) –  d12frosted Mar 28 '14 at 11:43
    
In any case, if the IDs are included in the JSON data you should be able to parse them normally. –  duplode Mar 28 '14 at 12:09
    
Sorry, but I don't understand, what do you mean by normally? Everything I know about vertex ids is that they are keys and they are numbers. Nothing more. But I found solution, see my answer :) –  d12frosted Mar 28 '14 at 12:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The edit to your answer shows you understood how to solve your immediate problem. Still, you can make your code a lot clearer by avoiding most of the explicit list manipulation needed to build the vertexes. The plan is:

  • Define a FromJSON instance for Point;
  • Use it to define a FromJSON instance for Vertex. That would go rather like the Rule instance in other answer to the question you linked to, except that, since you want to use the object keys as IDs, the case statement there would become something like:

    case M.toList (o :: Object) of
        [(rawID, rawPoint)] -> Vertex (TR.decimal rawId) <$> parseJSON rawPoint
        _                   -> fail "Rule: unexpected format"
    
  • Finally, your existing FromJSON Graph instance will, I believe, work straight away if you change the (inferred) type of vs to [Vertex], given the instance FromJSON a => FromJSON [a]. Therefore, you won't need parseVertices anymore.

If you have control over the JSON structure, it might make sense to simplify things even further by making the vertex IDs a field alongside x and y, removing one level of nesting.

Update: An implementation of the instances, based on the one you added to your answer:

instance FromJSON Point where
  parseJSON (Object v) = liftM2 Point (v .: "x") (v .: "y")
  parseJSON _          = fail "Bad point"

instance FromJSON [Vertex] where
  parseJSON j = case j of
    (Object o) -> mapM parseVertex $ M.toList o
    _          -> fail "Bad vertices"
    where
      parseVertex (rawID, rawPoint) = do
        let eID = TR.decimal rawID
        liftM2 Vertex (either (fail "Bad vertex id") (return . fst) eID) $
          parseJSON rawPoint

instance FromJSON Graph where
  parseJSON (Object v) = do
    i <- parseJSON =<< v .: "id"
    vs <- parseJSON =<< v .: "vertices"
    sc <- parseJSON =<< v .: "scenario"
    return $ Graph i vs sc
  parseJSON _ = fail "Bad graph"

(Get the implementation as a runnable example)

The differences to your version are:

  • You do not need to define an instance for [Graph]; if you define the Graph instance aeson will handle the lists (i.e. JS arrays) automatically (note that the FromJSON documentation mentions a FromJSON a => FromJSON [a] instance. Unfortunately we cannot do the same (at least not as easily) with [Vertex], given that the vertex IDs are keys and not part of the values.
  • I Added fail cases for the pattern match failures, in order to get more informative error messages.
  • On your observation about creating the vertices from Either values: your solution was pretty reasonable. I only refactored it using either (from Data.Either) in order to supply a custom error message.

It is worth mentioning that liftM2 (or liftM3, etc.) code tends to look nicer if written using applicative style. For instance, the interesting case in the Point instance might become:

parseJSON (Object v) = Point <$> v .: "x" <*> v .: "y"
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for detailed response. I will work on improving my code on weekends. Stay in touch :) –  d12frosted Mar 28 '14 at 14:32
    
Hey, checkout my answer update. Thank you for helping, now code is much cleaner. –  d12frosted Mar 30 '14 at 14:45
    
About changing JSON structure: i have no power here :( –  d12frosted Mar 30 '14 at 14:46
1  
Oh, thank you for your update. It's a shame, that I can't "+1" twice :). About [Graph]: I need to implement it, because the real structure of json file is "{ "graph1": {<graph>}, "graph12": {<graph>}, ... }. About either: wow, didn't know about this "constructor" function. Yay, i won't loose the advantages of either. About liftM2: yeah, I know it's definition. :) And thank's for creating gist :) –  d12frosted Mar 30 '14 at 18:56

I just implemented solution for simple case. Here is the source code:

lookupE :: Value -> Text -> Either String Value
lookupE (Object obj) key = case H.lookup key obj of
        Nothing -> Left $ "key " ++ show key ++ " not present"
        Just v  -> Right v
loopkupE _ _             = Left $ "not an object"

(.:*) :: (FromJSON a) => Value -> [Text] -> Parser a
(.:*) value = parseJSON <=< foldM ((either fail return .) . lookupE) value

instance FromJSON Graph where
  parseJSON (Object v) = do
    i <- parseJSON =<< v .: "id"
    vs <- parseJSON =<< v .: "vertices"
    sc <- parseJSON =<< v .: "scenario"
    buildGraph i sc <$> concat <$> parseVertices vs
      where
        parseVertices v@(Object o) = parseFromTo minID maxID v
          where
            minID = unpackIndex $ Foldable.minimum ids
            maxID = unpackIndex $ Foldable.maximum ids
            unpackIndex eitherI = case eitherI of
              Right i -> i
              Left e -> error e
            ids = map ((fmap fst) . TR.decimal) (M.keys o)

        parseVertex i v = do
          p1 <- v .:* [(T.pack $ show i), "x"]
          p2 <- v .:* [(T.pack $ show i), "y"]
          return $ vertex i p1 p2

        parseFromTo i j v | i == j = return []
                          | otherwise = do
          vertex <- parseVertex i v
          liftM2 (:) (return [vertex]) (parseFromTo (i + 1) j v)

        buildGraph :: Int -> Scenario -> [Vertex] -> Graph
        buildGraph i sc vertices = Graph i vertices sc

  parseJSON _ = mzero

Function lookupE and (.:*) are from Petr Pudlák's answer.

I don't really like this implementation of parseJSON function. But it works in cases when my vertices have ids with delta 1. I know that I could not extracted value from Foldable.minimum ids and Foldable.maximum ids, but it has brought me to the monad hell (a little one).

So here is an example of json-file, after parsing of which we got Nothing:

{
    "id": 1,
    "vertices": {
        "3": {
            "y": 12,
            "x": 0
        },
        "2": {
            "y": 16,
            "x": 24
        },
        "1": {
            "y": 12,
            "x": 10
        }
    },
    "scenario": [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        1
    ]
}

So I leave this question opened for now.

Update

Oh, I just saw my mistake. I already have all keys. :)

ids = map ((fmap fst) . TR.decimal) (M.keys o)

Now I leave this question opened for few days more. Maybe someone will improve my solution.

Update 2

Thanks to duplode, I made code more clear and readable.

Here is the source:

instance FromJSON Point where
  parseJSON (Object v) = liftM2 Point (v .: "x") (v .: "y")

instance FromJSON [Vertex] where
  parseJSON (Object o) = mapM parseVertex $ M.toList o
    where
      parseVertex (rawID, rawPoint) = Vertex (fromRight . (fmap fst) . TR.decimal $ rawID) <$> parseJSON rawPoint

instance FromJSON Graph where
  parseJSON (Object v) = do
    i <- parseJSON =<< v .: "id"
    vs <- parseJSON =<< v .: "vertices"
    sc <- parseJSON =<< v .: "scenario"
    return $ Graph i vs sc

instance FromJSON [Graph] where
  parseJSON (Object o) = mapM parseGraph $ M.toList o
    where
      parseGraph (_, rawGraph) = parseJSON rawGraph

And I don't need any helper functions to extract nested values.

BTW, I don't know any better way to create Vertex rather then Vertex (fromRight . (fmap fst) . TR.decimal $ rawID) <$> parseJSON rawPoint. liftM2 can't be used because second argument has type Either a b, but third has type Parser c. Can't combine :)

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my answer with an implementation based on yours, with a few minor changes. –  duplode Mar 30 '14 at 18:10

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