Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

With the following code

{-# LANGUAGE Arrows #-}
{-# LANGUAGE NoMonomorphismRestriction #-}
import Text.XML.HXT.Core

parseXml :: IOSArrow XmlTree XmlTree
parseXml = getChildren >>> getChildren >>>
  proc x -> do
    y <- x >- hasName "item"
    returnA -< x

main :: IO ()
main = do
    person <- runX (readString [withValidate no]
                    "<xml><item>John</item><item2>Smith</item2></xml>"
                    >>> parseXml)
    putStrLn $ show person
    return ()

I get the output

[NTree (XTag "item" []) [NTree (XText "John") []]]

So it seems that hasName "item" was applied to x which I did not expect. Using arrowp I get for parseXml:

parseXml
   = getChildren >>> getChildren >>>
      (arr (\ x -> (x, x)) >>>
         (first (hasName "item") >>> arr (\ (y, x) -> x)))

So I have the arrow diagram

                                                       y
                                   /-- hasName "item" ---
                               x  /                       
-- getChildren -- getChildren ---\x->(x,x)              \(y,x)->x --- final result
                                  \                       / 
                                   \---------------------/  

Why is hasName "item" also applied to second place of the tuple? I thought there is no state in haskell and hasName "item" x returns a new object instead of changing the internal state of x.

Related question: Is factoring an arrow out of arrow do notation a valid transformation?

My original problem

I have the following code:

{-# LANGUAGE Arrows #-}
import Text.XML.HXT.Core

data Person = Person { forname :: String, surname :: String } deriving (Show)

parseXml :: IOSArrow XmlTree Person
parseXml = proc x -> do
    forname <- x >- this /> this /> hasName "fn" /> getText
    surname <- x >- this /> this /> hasName "sn" /> getText
    returnA -< Person forname surname

main :: IO ()
main = do
    person <- runX (readString [withValidate no]
                               "<p><fn>John</fn><sn>Smith</sn></p>"
                    >>> parseXml)
    putStrLn $ show person
    return ()

If I run it everything works fine and I get the output

[Person {forname = "John", surname = "Smith"}]

But if I change the parseXml to avoid the this statements

parseXml :: IOSArrow XmlTree Person
parseXml = (getChildren >>> getChildren) >>> proc x -> do
    forname <- x >- hasName "fn" /> getText
    surname <- x >- hasName "sn" /> getText
    returnA -< Person forname surname

no person can be parsed anymore (output is []). Investigating the problem with

parseXml :: IOSArrow XmlTree Person
parseXml = (getChildren >>> getChildren) >>>
  proc x -> do
    forname <- x >- withTraceLevel 5 traceTree >>> hasName "fn" /> getText
    surname <- x >- hasName "sn" /> getText
    returnA -< Person forname surname

I got the output

content of: 
============

---XTag "fn"
   |
   +---XText "John"



content of: 
============

---XTag "sn"
   |
   +---XText "Smith"


[]

So everything seems fine, but with the code

parseXml :: IOSArrow XmlTree Person
parseXml = (getChildren >>> getChildren) >>>
  proc x -> do
    forname <- x >- hasName "fn" /> getText
    surname <- x >- withTraceLevel 5 traceTree >>> hasName "sn" /> getText
    returnA -< Person forname surname

I got

content of: 
============

---XTag "fn"
   |
   +---XText "John"


[]

So it seems to me, that the value of the input x changes between the two statements. It looks like the hasName "fn" was applied to x before it was attached to the surname arrow. But shall x not remain the same between the two lines?

share|improve this question
1  
Seems to be related to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/21995888/… –  Tom Ellis Mar 28 at 9:29
1  
"I thought there is no state in haskell" <- You need to be careful with this. The language Haskell itself is stateless, but there are various ways to encode state in Haskell, for example monads and, yes, arrows! –  Tom Ellis Mar 28 at 10:20
1  
hasName "item" restricts the computation to those x which have name "item" regardless of whether you use y or not. –  Tom Ellis Mar 28 at 10:22
    
@TomEllis: Add the original problem so that your posted answer fits again to the question... ;-) –  tampis Mar 28 at 10:23
    
It might be clearer to you if you think of hasName as whereHasName or filterHasName. –  Tom Ellis Mar 28 at 10:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, the input can't change and it doesn't.

What you've programmed in the lines

proc x -> do
  y <- x >- hasName "item"
  returnA -< x

is just a filter removing all nodes not named item. His is equivalent to the arrow

hasName "item" `guards` this

You can test this with

{-# LANGUAGE Arrows #-}
{-# LANGUAGE NoMonomorphismRestriction #-}

module Main where

import Text.XML.HXT.Core

parseXml0 :: IOSArrow XmlTree XmlTree
parseXml0 = getChildren >>> getChildren >>>
  proc x -> do
    _ <- hasName "item" -< x
    returnA -< x

parseXml1 :: IOSArrow XmlTree XmlTree
parseXml1 = getChildren >>> getChildren >>>
            (hasName "item" `guards` this)

main1 :: Show c => IOSArrow XmlTree c -> IO ()
main1 parseXml = do
    person <- runX (readString [withValidate no]
                    "<xml><item>John</item><item2>Smith</item2></xml>"
                    >>> parseXml)
    putStrLn $ show person
    return ()

main :: IO ()
main = main1 parseXml0 >> main1 parseXml1
share|improve this answer

EDIT: OK, well now you've complete changed your question!

The working example should be interpreted as follows:

For the top level tag x

  • iterate over all the texts (getText) of grandchildren (this /> this) where the name is "fn" (hasName "fn"), using forname to hold these values
  • iterate over all the texts (getText) of grandchildren (this /> this) where the name is "sn" (hasName "sn"), using surname to hold these values
  • yield Person forname surname for each such pair

This looks like it works, but is perhaps not doing what you think it's doing. Try running the code on the input "<p><fn>John</fn><sn>Smith</sn><fn>Anne</fn><sn>Jones</sn></p>" for example. Four names are printed.

The broken example should be interpreted as follows:

For every grandchild x

  • if x has the name "fn" then store the text in forname (otherwise skip to the next x)
  • if x has the name "sn" then store the text in surname (otherwise skip to the next x)

A tag can't have the name "fn" and the name "sn"! Thus every tag is skipped.

Your investigation is just showing the point of the computation at which the tags are skipped. In the first case both the tags are present, as nothing has been filtered yet. In the second case only the "fn" tag is present because the first command has filtered everything else out.

EDIT: You may find this example (done in terms of the list monad) instructive.

import Control.Monad ((>=>))

data XML = Text String | Tag String [XML] deriving Show

this :: a -> [a]
this = return

(/>) :: (a -> [XML]) -> (XML -> [c]) -> a -> [c]
f /> g = f >=> getChildren >=> g

(>--) :: a -> (a -> b) -> b
x >-- f = f x

getChildren :: XML -> [XML]
getChildren (Text _) = []
getChildren (Tag _ c) = c

hasName :: String -> XML -> [XML]
hasName _ (Text _) = []
hasName n i@(Tag n' _) = if n == n' then [i] else []

getText :: XML -> [String]
getText (Text t) = [t]
getText (Tag _ _) = []

parseXML :: XML -> [(String, String)]
parseXML = \x -> do
  forname <- x >-- (this /> this /> hasName "fn" /> getText)
  surname <- x >-- (this /> this /> hasName "sn" /> getText)
  return (forname, surname)

parseXMLBroken :: XML -> [(String, String)]
parseXMLBroken = getChildren >=> getChildren >=> \x -> do
  forname <- x >-- (hasName "fn" /> getText)
  surname <- x >-- (hasName "sn" /> getText)
  return (forname, surname)

runX :: (XML -> a) -> XML -> a
runX f xml = f (Tag "/" [xml])

xml :: XML
xml = (Tag "p" [ Tag "fn" [Text "John"]
               , Tag "sn" [Text "Smith"] ])

example1 = runX parseXML xml

example2 = runX parseXMLBroken xml

*Main> example1
[("John","Smith")]
*Main> example2
[]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.