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How is it possible to plot grouped bars below one line graph?

The figure could show the performance of classification experiments (e.g. Accuracy) as line (thicker then standard). Using the left Y-scale, variation between 0 < Accuracy < 1, with following text: "This is accuracy".

Then the the number of features (e.g. for text classification), may be expressed by bars. Right Y-scale, variation between 0 < NOoFeatures < max(featuresX), text: "No. of features". X-scale, text "The used features for each experiment".

There are actually four categories of text features which could be represented stacked (would be nice) or grouped (preferred) bars. If now all would be displayed in gray-scale tones, would be perfect ;)

## Mock-up data:
performanceExps <- c(0.4, 0.5, 0.65, 0.9) # Accuracy
FeaturesExp1 <- c(featuresA=1000, featuresB=0, featuresC=0, featuresD=0) # Used features Experiment 1
FeaturesExp2 <- c(featuresA=1000, featuresB=5000, featuresC=0, featuresD=0) # Used features Experiment 2
FeaturesExp3 <- c(featuresA=1000, featuresB=5000, featuresC=10000, featuresD=0) # Used features Experiment 3
FeaturesExp4 <- c(featuresA=1000, featuresB=5000, featuresC=10000, featuresD=20000) # Used features Experiment 4

Kohske offers (below) one example which is pretty similar, but I cannot adapt it to my problem (use bars).

library(ggplot2)
library(gtable)
library(grid)

grid.newpage()

# two plots
p1 <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(mpg, disp)) + geom_line(colour = "blue") + theme_bw()
p2 <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(mpg, drat)) + geom_line(colour = "red") + theme_bw() %+replace% 
  theme(panel.background = element_rect(fill = NA))

# extract gtable
g1 <- ggplot_gtable(ggplot_build(p1))
g2 <- ggplot_gtable(ggplot_build(p2))

# overlap the panel of 2nd plot on that of 1st plot
pp <- c(subset(g1$layout, name == "panel", se = t:r))
g <- gtable_add_grob(g1, g2$grobs[[which(g2$layout$name == "panel")]], pp$t, 
                     pp$l, pp$b, pp$l)

# axis tweaks
ia <- which(g2$layout$name == "axis-l")
ga <- g2$grobs[[ia]]
ax <- ga$children[[2]]
ax$widths <- rev(ax$widths)
ax$grobs <- rev(ax$grobs)
ax$grobs[[1]]$x <- ax$grobs[[1]]$x - unit(1, "npc") + unit(0.15, "cm")
g <- gtable_add_cols(g, g2$widths[g2$layout[ia, ]$l], length(g$widths) - 1)
g <- gtable_add_grob(g, ax, pp$t, length(g$widths) - 1, pp$b)

grid.draw(g)

Here the question ends -- This is the code of hrbmstr (thank you!)

featPerf <- data.frame( expS=c("1", "2", "3", "4"),
                        Experiment1=c(1000, 0, 0, 0),
                        Experiment2=c(1000, 5000, 0, 0),
                        Experiment3=c(1000, 5000, 10000, 0),
                        Experiment4=c(1000, 5000, 10000,20000),
                        accuracy=c(0.4, 0.5, 0.65, 0.9) )

# make room for both axes ; adjust as necessary
par(mar=c(5, 12, 6, 7) + 0.4) 

# plot the bars first with no annotations and specify limits for y
#barplot(as.matrix(featPerf[,2:5]), axes=FALSE, xlab="", ylab="", ylim=c(0, max(colSums(featPerf[2:5]))))
barplot(as.matrix(featPerf[,2:5]), axes=FALSE, xlab="", ylab="", beside=TRUE)

# make the bounding box (or not...it might not make sense for your plot)
#box()

# now make the left axis
axis(2, ylim=c(0, max(colSums(featPerf[2:5]))), col="black", las=1)

# start a new plot
par(new=TRUE)

# plot the line; adjust lwd as necessary
plot(x=1:4, y=featPerf[,6], xlab="Experiments", ylab="", axes=FALSE, type="l", ylim=c(0,1), lwd=5)

# annotate the second axis
axis(4, ylim=c(0,1), col="black", col.axis="black", las=1)
#axis(4, ylim=c(0,1), col="black", col.axis="black", las=1, labels="Accuracy", at = .5, side=3)

#title("An Example of Creative Axes", xlab="X values", ylab="Y=X")
mtext("Accuracy", side=4, line=3, cex.lab=1,las=2, col="black")
mtext("No. of features    ", side=2, line=3, cex.lab=1,las=2, col="black")
share|improve this question
    
what is your data, what is at least a mock-up of what you want it to look like, what have you tried so far besides pasting that RPubs sample? –  hrbrmstr Mar 29 at 1:58
    
@hrbrmstr Thank you :) I added the mock-up data to the description above. –  alex Mar 29 at 5:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Solution by tweaking Kohske's example. This is results in similar plot to hrbrmstr's solution - completely agree over rethinking the plot.

library(ggplot2)
library(gtable)
library(reshape2)

# Data
featPerf <- data.frame( exp=c("1", "2", "3", "4"),
                    A=c(1000, 1000, 1000, 1000),
                    B=c(0, 5000, 5000, 5000),
                    C=c(1000, 5000, 10000, 0),
                    D=c(1000, 5000, 10000 ,20000),
                    accuracy=c(0.4, 0.5, 0.65, 0.9) )

# Barplot ------------------------------------------------
# Reshape data for barplot
df.m <- melt(featPerf[-6])

# Labels for barplot
df.m$barlab <- factor(paste("Experiment", df.m$exp) )

p1 <- ggplot(df.m , aes(x=barlab, y=value, fill=variable)) + 
           geom_bar( stat="identity", position="dodge") +
           scale_fill_grey(start =.1, end = .7 ) +
           xlab("Experiments") + 
           ylab("Number of Labels") + 
           theme(legend.position="top")
g1 <- ggplotGrob(p1)

# Lineplot ------------------------------------------------
p2 <- ggplot(featPerf , aes(x=exp, y=accuracy, group=1)) + geom_line(size=2)  + 
            scale_y_continuous(limits=c(0,1)) + 
            ylab("Accuracy") +
            theme(panel.background = element_rect(fill = NA),
                  panel.grid.major = element_blank(), 
                  panel.grid.minor = element_blank())
g2 <- ggplotGrob(p2)


# Add plots together
pp <- c(subset(g1$layout, name == "panel", se = t:r))
g <- gtable_add_grob(g1, g2$grobs[[which(g2$layout$name == "panel")]], pp$t, 
                 pp$l, pp$b, pp$l)


# Add second axis for accuracy
ia <- which(g2$layout$name == "axis-l")
ga <- g2$grobs[[ia]]
ax <- ga$children[[2]]
ax$widths <- rev(ax$widths)
ax$grobs <- rev(ax$grobs)
ax$grobs[[1]]$x <- ax$grobs[[1]]$x - unit(1, "npc") + unit(0.15, "cm")
g <- gtable_add_cols(g, g2$widths[g2$layout[ia, ]$l], length(g$widths) - 1)
g <- gtable_add_grob(g, ax, pp$t, length(g$widths) - 1, pp$b)


# Add second y-axis title 
ia <- which(g2$layout$name == "ylab")
ax <- g2$grobs[[ia]]
# str(ax) # you can change features (size, colour etc for these - 
# change rotation below 
ax$rot <- 270
g <- gtable_add_cols(g, g2$widths[g2$layout[ia, ]$l], length(g$widths) - 1)
g <- gtable_add_grob(g, ax, pp$t, length(g$widths) - 1, pp$b)

grid.draw(g)
share|improve this answer
    
It works :) Great! Thank you. You're great. However Is it possible to set the grayscale + scale_fill_grey(start =.1, end = .7) (works) after ggplot p1, add scales xLabels <- c("Experiment1", "Experiment2", "Experiment3", "Experiment4") (works not), xName="Experiments"(works not), yLeftName="Number of Labels", yRightName="Accuracy"` (works not). –  alex Mar 29 at 19:26
    
The plot shows the effect on accuracy of different (additional) features used in my experiments. If you want to see the perfect non ggplot (aside the missing legend) use the code below my question. Thank you :) –  alex Mar 29 at 19:44
    
@alex; Updated - there are still a couple of things to tweak - have fun. –  user20650 Mar 29 at 22:42
    
Thank you! This is awesome! Have a nice day :) –  alex Mar 30 at 10:44

Thx for posting a data sample! I think this is what you want. CAVEAT: I encourage you to do side-by-side vs overlay the plots since I'm firmly in the Few [PDF] camp when it comes to dual axes plots. There's a reason ggplot2 makes it wicked hard to do it. To that end, if you are willing to resort to base graphics, it's pretty straightforward.

# make a data frame for convenience 

featPerf <- data.frame( exp=c("1", "2", "3", "4"),
                        A=c(1000, 1000, 1000, 1000),
                        B=c(0, 5000, 5000, 5000),
                        C=c(1000, 5000, 10000, 0),
                        D=c(1000, 5000, 10000 ,20000),
                        accuracy=c(0.4, 0.5, 0.65, 0.9) )

# make room for both axes ; adjust as necessary
par(mar=c(5, 5, 5, 7) + 0.2) 

# plot the bars first with no annotations and specify limits for y
barplot(as.matrix(featPerf[,2:5]), axes=FALSE, xlab="", ylab="", ylim=c(0, max(colSums(featPerf[2:5]))))

# make the bounding box (or not...it might not make sense for your plot)
box()

# now make the left axis
axis(2, ylim=c(0, max(colSums(featPerf[2:5]))), col="black", las=1)

# start a new plot
par(new=TRUE)

# plot the line; adjust lwd as necessary
plot(x=1:4, y=featPerf[,6], xlab="", ylab="", axes=FALSE, type="l", ylim=c(0,1), lwd=5)

# annotate the second axis
axis(4, ylim=c(0,1), col="black", col.axis="black", las=1)

plot

You can adjust or add annotations/margins/colors as you need to. I've done enough damage the way it is :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, very nice! Is it possible to make the columns grouped. Also, i added the your adapted code below my question, in order to show how I imagined the stacked columns. Too often I'm be not as precise as I wish (sorry!). Thank you for pacience :-| –  alex Mar 29 at 16:29
    
hello, Thank you! I acchieved the variation (see comment above). Please check and add the code below my question in order to answer the initial question (stacked, grouped). Since I'm very new, if you can spare a second, I would appreciate if you change the code in order to avoid the crash of the column scaling with the ylab text, AND add a basic legend between the y-skales, of the line and the bars (is this technically possible), without border. Big Thanks. I'm submitting on monday my thesis and it would take me hours to find this out. –  alex Mar 29 at 17:23
    
Observed another problem. If adding labels="Accuraces" for the right hand side i get a wired error 'labels' is supplied and not 'at' Thank you. –  alex Mar 29 at 17:56
    
@hrbmstr Axes names solved. Legend is not solved (is it possible to make a legend which includes the bars as well as the line? -- without borders). The code is below my question. Best wishes –  alex Mar 29 at 19:51

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