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So I am trying to implement a mouse listener into my program, I got the mouseListener to work but not the graphics. I am trying to find a way to draw a blue circle every time the mouse is clicked on the JPANEL, the only problem is I can not seem to get a good call for the Graphics (that I have tried to name g).

    import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;



class moveItMon extends JPanel implements MouseListener{

    public moveItMon() {
        this.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(500, 500));
        addMouseListener(this);
    }

    public void addNotify() {
        super.addNotify();
        requestFocus();
    }

    public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e){}
    public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e){}
    public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e){}
    public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e){}
    public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent e) {
        movetehMon(e);
    }

    public void movetehMon(MouseEvent e){
        int x = e.getX();
        int y = e.getY();
        System.out.println("(" + x + "," + y + ")");
        paintMon(x,y);
    }
    public void paintMon( int x, int y){
        Graphics g = new Graphics();
        g.setColor(Color.WHITE);
        g.clearRect(0,0,500,500);
        g.setColor(Color.BLUE);
        g.fillOval(x,y,20,20);
    }

    public static void main(String[] s) {
        JFrame f = new JFrame("moveItMon");
        f.getContentPane().add(new moveItMon());
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.pack();
        f.setVisible(true);
    }


}
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just a tip, according to java code conventions class name should start with a Upper case letter –  Templar Mar 28 at 1:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Graphics g = new Graphics(); isn't going to work (as I'm sure you're aware) as the class is abstract.

Custom painting in Swing is done by overriding the paintComponent of a component that extends from JComponent (like JPanel) and using the supplied Graphics context to paint to.

Take a look at Performing Custom Painting and Painting in AWT and Swing for more details

You should also beware that painting is a destructive process, meaning that each time paintComponent is called, you are expected to update everything that you need painted.

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Thanks yet again. One more question that may sound silly, is there a way to implement a drawing(which I wish to use as a hit box) that doesn't change using the graphics component? –  Bagel Mar 28 at 1:11
1  
There are at least two ways to achieve it. The first is store each shape you generate in some kind of List and iterate this list each time the paintComponent is called. This would require to store information about color and other properties along with the shape. The other is to use a BufferedImage as the primary canvas, paint to this directly and when paintComponent is called, paint the image to the Graphics context –  MadProgrammer Mar 28 at 1:16

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