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I'll reference parts of the question to simplify what I'm referencing, I'm a non-traditional PHP developer so ask before you edit because past edits have destroyed questions and wasted the time of people trying to answer. If I don't understand the why of what you're telling me I can't understand the code even if it works.

The First Half

Part 1.1: My main question is simply this: how do I make the variable assigned to mysqli_connect() non-global yet clean reliably accessible?

Part 1.2: Adding some complexity to the issue: I access the same file for both AJAX and non-AJAX requests and the "dirty" part is the constant need to check if a non-global variable isset().

My structure for traditional non-AJAX requests looks like the following...

PHP Includes Structure

Part 1.3: Currently I have mysqli_connect() assigned to a global variable which I read all the time is apparently pure evil. As far as I can tell the whole global versus (what is non-global, local?) bit is in basic terms the ability to expose only PART of your server code so others can use PHP with a custom API you've built (if not then try to explain it in a single sentence with WHY a human would do that). I have no plans to create any APIs in this fashion though still would like to better understand this topic within the limited scope as in only what applies directly to this question to serve as a basis for the future.


Here is a slimmed down version of my database connection file; I've added commentary to clarify what is going on. I'm not looking to make any super-wild changes though I am obviously looking to improve my approach...

<?php
//This file included by the main PHP file.

if ($_SERVER['HTTP_HOST']!='localhost' && substr($_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'],0,7)!='192.168')
{// LIVE domain
 $p0 = explode('www.',$_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'],2);
 $domain = $p0[1];
}
else
{// Local or network access
 $p0 = explode('www.',$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'],2);
 $p1 = explode('/',$p0[1],2);
 $domain = $p1[0];
}

if (!isset($_SESSION['user_status']) || $_SESSION['user_status']<8)
{//Common VERY limited SQL syntax access only.
 $GLOBALS['connection'] = mysqli_connect($vars['db_host'],$vars['db_user'],$vars['db_pass'],$vars['db_db']);
}
else
{//Admin SQL syntax access
 $GLOBALS['connection'] = mysqli_connect($vars['db_host'],$vars['db_user_admin'],$vars['db_pass_admin'],$vars['db_db']);
}    

if ($GLOBALS['connection'])
{
 if (!isset($_SESSION)) {include('sessions.php');}
 $_SESSION['database'] = 1;

 $dbs = true;//structure leftover from 'mysql' to 'mysqli' API switch.

 if ($dbs)
 {//Timezone, etc...
  $query1 = "SET time_zone = '+00:00';";
  $result1 = mysqli_query($GLOBALS['connection'],$query1);

  if ($result1) {}
  else {mysqli_error_report($query1,mysqli_error($GLOBALS['connection']),__FUNCTION__);}
 }
}
?>

So currently queries tend to look like this...

$result1 = mysqli_query($GLOBALS['connection'],$query1);

The Second Half

Part 2.1 After a bit of reading it seems that the intended approach for handling mysqli_connect() is to treat the variable in a procedural fashion. I'd much rather assign it once and not have to reconnect to the database seven times if there are seven SQL queries for a single page request (I currently connect once and can see it clearly with MySQL query log enabled). I've often encountered issues where the connection already exists (the dirty aspect of this) which creates conflicts. Even when I utilize classes I have to manually pass them as parameters to functions that are apparently too "deep" via PHP includes to be simply seen globally. So I'm looking to make sure I can have a standard include() of some kind that works cleanly around the site regardless of whether it's an AJAX request or not.

Part 2.2 So in another fashion if we're supposed to use mysqli_connect() in a procedural fashion what keeps the non-global variable from forcing PHP to reconnect to the database for say, all seven MySQL queries for a single page request?

Part 2.3 Simply put what is the best thing to assign mysqli_connect() to (variable, class, object...and what is it's scope)?

Part 2.4 Simply put what is the best way to include the file where mysqli_connect() is located (for the entire site) for more miscellaneous situations such as AJAX requests?

I'll be happy to clarify/edit as needed.

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tl;dr how about singleton? – kingkero Mar 28 '14 at 2:02

how do I make the variable assigned to mysqli_connect() non-global yet clean reliably accessible?

this one is simple.
If your application architecture is using OOP all the way, then just don't bother - by the time you need this variable, it will be always ready already surely you'll need no raw mysqli object at all.

If you are writing in the old good plain procedural PHP - just make it global.

I access the same file for both AJAX and non-AJAX requests

this one just have no relation to db problem at all.
Learn to use templates (or better MVC separation) and you will find that you can use exactly the same code to serve any request.

the ability to expose only PART of your server code so others can use PHP

This one is wrong.
the reasons are different.

Simply put what is the best thing to assign mysqli_connect() to

In fact, you are concerning of the most trifle things. While paying no attention to real ones.

And your real problem is use of prepared statements. If you are planning to use mysqli_query with raw SQL queries exactly the same way you used to be with old mysql_query - then there is not a single reason to move on - just keep with old mysql_query. As simple as that.

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