Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my app I'm polling a web service for status updates, using a completionHandler block and making changes to the current view based on returned results when the callback executes.

- (void) tickTimer
{
   [MyWebService myWebMethod:param1 completionHandler:^(NSString *result) {
       // does view still exist?
       [self myUpdateMethod];
       // does property still exist?
       self.theResult = result;
       // does child view still exist?
       _txtUpdate.text = result;
   }];
}

But in the interim, it's possible that the view may have been unloaded as the user navigates elsewhere.

So a couple of questions:

  1. What happens to a view when a new one is loaded and it gets pushed to the background? I imagine it gets garbage collected at some point, but how do I tell if it's still safe to access by any of the references above, and what would happen if it's not?

  2. If the view does still exist, how do I tell if it is also still the foreground view?

share|improve this question
    
Nice joke! Garbage collected in IOS :) –  Cy-4AH Mar 28 at 5:59
    
@Cy-4AH, why a joke? I'm talking about ARC. The difference is? –  stephen Mar 28 at 6:04
    
There is huge difference between garbage collection and ARC: In garbage collection environment object life-time is decided in run-time, with enabled ARC object life-time is decided at compile-time. –  Cy-4AH Mar 28 at 6:33
    
@Cy-4AH, are you sure? Since ARC objects are only deallocated when the reference count reaches zero, how can this possibly be decided at compile time? It will depend entirely on the runtime behavior of references being added or removed. In this sense, it seems very much like COM. Different from GC only in that it gives the system no discretion over the timing of the deallocation. –  stephen Mar 28 at 6:56
    
You have answered yours question by yourself: it's decided by adding and removing references. Do you know what is ARC? It's automatic reference counting. With ARC you don't need call retain and release any more, because compiler will do it for you. So with such mechanism it's decided at compile time in the same way how it was before ARC. –  Cy-4AH Mar 28 at 7:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, blocks create strong references to all objects pointers that are referred to in their closure. Due to this, your block is going to force [self] to stay in memory until the block is destroyed. If this isn't the behavior you want you should create a weak pointer to self and refer to it inside of the block:

__weak typeof(self) weakSelf = self;

So a couple of questions:

What happens to a view when a new one is loaded and it gets pushed to the background? I imagine it gets garbage collected at some point, but how do I tell if it's still safe to access by any of the references above, and what would happen if it's not?

If your view stays in the view hierarchy, it will stay in memory. Once there are no more references to the view it will be dealloced.

If you use a weak pointer like outlined above, then [weakSelf] will be nil if the view has been dealloced

If the view does still exist, how do I tell if it is also still the foreground view?

I'm not sure what you mean by foreground view, but if you want to see if it's still in the view hierarchy then you can check the property -(UIView *)superview. If superview is nil, then it's not on the screen

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Justin, very helpful. Sorry for my terminology, I've realised I should be talking about controllers here. I switch views using [UIViewController instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier] after loading them from the storyboard. How do I tell if the controller that contains the completionHandler block is still the visible one? –  stephen Mar 28 at 5:12
  1. If you use ARC right, it will not let you use deallocated viewcontroller.
  2. You can use viewDidAppear and viewDidDisappear methods to know visible yours viewcontroller or not.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.