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I have a class like this:

template <class Object = NullObject>
class MyClass : OptimizedStorage<Object> {
...

public:
    //Cannot do this in Visual studio 2012
    template <class Object2 = Object,
              class = enable_if<!is_same<Object2, NullObject>::value>>
    Object & get() const {
        return this->object_;
    }
}

Does anyone know:

  1. A workaround for having this interface.
  2. Some other workaround that even if it makes things a bit more dirty, still allows me to get() my underlying object when it exists.

Regards

share|improve this question
    
You may use std::enable_if on the return type. – Jarod42 Mar 28 '14 at 8:28
    
BTW, second template argument should be class = typename enable_if<!is_same<Object2, NullObject>::value>::type – Jarod42 Mar 28 '14 at 8:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple workaround is to write a wrapper function which just calls the template. For example:

private:
    template<typename ENABLER>
    Object& get_()
    {
        return this->object_;
    }

    template<typename Object2>
    Object& get_()
    {
        return get_<typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<Object2,NullObject>::value>::type>();
    }

public:
    //Overload for default Object template parameter:
    Object& get()
    {
        return get_<Object>();
    }

Of course the compiler is cappable of inline all the wrappings, so performance is not a concern here.

Note that I have dopped the const qualifier: You are returning a reference to internal data, that getters cannot/shouldn't be const.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work since I need to enable or disable the function given the template parameter. The frontend function must exist only in some cases and I cannot figure out how to solve that. – Germán Diago Mar 28 '14 at 8:23
    
Seems to not compile in my case. It gets confused about two versions of get_ function. – Germán Diago Mar 28 '14 at 8:31
    
With a small change it worked. I named the most internal function to get2_ – Germán Diago Mar 28 '14 at 8:34
    
@GermanDiago sorry for the mistakes, I have just written the solution from my head too fast, I had no time enough to check it completely for correctness. I will update the answer later for future readers – Manu343726 Mar 28 '14 at 9:06

Following may help:

template <class Object = NullObject>
class MyClass {
    Object object_;

    template <class T>
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<T, NullObject>::value, Object &>::type
    get_() { return this->object_; }
public:
    Object& get() { return get_<Object>(); }
};

or you may specialize your struct (that may require some copy/paste :/ ):

template <class Object = NullObject>
class MyClass {
    Object object_;
public:
    Object& get() { return this->object_; }
};

template <>
class MyClass<NullObject> {
public:
    // No get function.
};
share|improve this answer
1  
I knew of this solution (partial specialization). But I hate to duplicate code. When you modify it, if you forget anything it's fragile. – Germán Diago Mar 28 '14 at 8:59

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