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Wireshark captures UDP packets in my LAN with follwoing details

Source IP            192.168.1.2
Destination IP      233.x.x.x
Source Port        24098
Destination Port      12074,12330

how can i capture it in c#?

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4 Answers 4

The Winpcap library is one of the best ways to do this. I have experience in doing this in C# and it was really easy to work with this library.

This project shows how to do it with C#.

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1  
I think you mean tamirgal.com/blog/page/SharpPcap.aspx SharpPCap ;-) –  weismat Feb 16 '10 at 7:19
1  
Its WinPcap. Follow the above link. I think SharpPCap is a wrapped version and perhaps it will be more convenient to use. –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara Feb 16 '10 at 7:23
1  
Above is a multicast stream. Can i use simple .Net sockett classes to retrieve packets??? –  Manjoor Feb 17 '10 at 5:01
1  
I think so.. Try this... codeproject.com/KB/IP/multicast.aspx –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara Feb 17 '10 at 5:08
1  
I tried it but no luck :( –  Manjoor Feb 17 '10 at 5:44
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Solved it myself

Here is my working code

class CAA
{

    private Socket UDPSocket = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram, ProtocolType.Udp);
    private IPAddress Target_IP;
    private int Target_Port;
    public static int bPause;

    public CAA()
    {
        Target_IP = IPAddress.Parse("x.x.x.x");
        Target_Port = xxx;

        try
        {
            IPEndPoint LocalHostIPEnd = new
            IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, Target_Port);
            UDPSocket.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Udp, SocketOptionName.NoDelay, 1);
            UDPSocket.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, 1);
            UDPSocket.Bind(LocalHostIPEnd);
            UDPSocket.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.IP, SocketOptionName.MulticastTimeToLive, 0);
            UDPSocket.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.IP, SocketOptionName.AddMembership, new
            MulticastOption(Target_IP));
            Console.WriteLine("Starting Recieve");
            Recieve();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message + " " + e.StackTrace);
        }
    }

    private void Recieve()
    {
        try
        {
            IPEndPoint LocalIPEndPoint = new
            IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, Target_Port);
            EndPoint LocalEndPoint = (EndPoint)LocalIPEndPoint;
            StateObject state = new StateObject();
            state.workSocket = UDPSocket;
            Console.WriteLine("Begin Recieve");
            UDPSocket.BeginReceiveFrom(state.buffer, 0, state.BufferSize, 0, ref LocalEndPoint, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
        }
    }

    private void ReceiveCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {

            IPEndPoint LocalIPEndPoint = new
            IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, Target_Port);
            EndPoint LocalEndPoint = (EndPoint)LocalIPEndPoint;
            StateObject state = (StateObject)ar.AsyncState;
            Socket client = state.workSocket;
            int bytesRead = client.EndReceiveFrom(ar, ref LocalEndPoint);            



            client.BeginReceiveFrom(state.buffer, 0, state.BufferSize, 0, ref LocalEndPoint, new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), state);
    }


    public static void Main()
    {       
        CAA o = new CAA();        
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public class StateObject
    {
        public int BufferSize = 512;
        public Socket workSocket;
        public byte[] buffer;

        public StateObject()
        {
            buffer = new byte[BufferSize];
        }
    }

}
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Wireshark actually uses Winpcap to do this, and as the other answer indicates, you can use it as well.

You can also use the System.Net.Sockets.Socket class and place it in promiscuous mode. I use this to capture the IP traffic (e.g., TCP and UDP) from a given network interface. Here's an example.

using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;

Socket socket =
    new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Raw, ProtocolType.IP);
socket.Bind(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse("X.X.X.X"), 0)); // specify IP address
socket.ReceiveBufferSize = 2 * 1024 * 1024; // 2 megabytes
socket.ReceiveTimeout = 500; // half a second
byte[] incoming = BitConverter.GetBytes(1);
byte[] outgoing = BitConverter.GetBytes(1);
socket.IOControl(IOControlCode.ReceiveAll, incoming, outgoing);

Now that the socket is created and configured, you can use the Receive() method to start receiving data. Each time you call Receive(), the returned buffer will contain an IP packet. See here for the breakout of the IPv4 header, here for the UDP header, and here for the TCP header. If the Protocol field of the IP header contains a value of 17, then you have a UDP packet.

NOTE Raw sockets on Windows require that you be an administrator on your local system. The following language is contained in this MSDN article.

To use a socket of type SOCK_RAW requires administrative privileges. Users running Winsock applications that use raw sockets must be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer, otherwise raw socket calls will fail with an error code of WSAEACCES. On Windows Vista and later, access for raw sockets is enforced at socket creation. In earlier versions of Windows, access for raw sockets is enforced during other socket operations.

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1  
Thanks for reply. I am checking it. Meanwhile note that that above is a multicast stream (UDP). –  Manjoor Feb 17 '10 at 5:21
1  
above code gives exception "An attempt was made to access a socket in a way forbidden by its access permissions" –  Manjoor Feb 17 '10 at 5:50
1  
I forgot to mention that you have to have admin privileges on your local machine to create a "raw" socket like this. I'm running this code inside a Windows service which is running under the SYSTEM account, so this issue doesn't bite me. Also, if you are doing multicast UDP, creating a socket this way does not join the multicast group. Thus, if you are behind a router, you are not guaranteed that the multicast traffic will be routed along the segment you're on. In short, you may want to join the multicast group with a second socket to ensure that this "raw" socket will see the data. –  Matt Davis Feb 17 '10 at 14:44

In order to use WinPcap for raw packet capturing in C#, you can try Pcap.Net. It is a wrapper for WinPcap in C++/CLI and C# for easily capturing (sniffing) and injecting raw packets and it also contains an easy to use packets interpretation framework.

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