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I am developing an app which needs to have exclusive access to the USB sound device. I found out that when the music is playing using this device then sometimes it is not possible to get access. So I need to stop and restart CoreAudio daemon.
I am using this piece of code (below) to get it work. But the problem is that after coreaudiod is stopped I can run it only under root user. By default it is ran under _coreaudiod user. How can I run it under _coreaudiod user as it's done by the OS?

#include <CoreFoundation/CFDictionary.h>
#include <Security/Authorization.h>

class ScopedAudioServiceStopper
{
public:
    ScopedAudioServiceStopper();
    ~ScopedAudioServiceStopper();
    void stop();

private:
    void start();

private:
    AuthorizationRef m_authorizationRef;
    CFDictionaryRef m_coreAudiodDictionary;
};
ScopedAudioServiceStopper::~ScopedAudioServiceStopper()
{
    start();
    if (m_coreAudiodDictionary)
            CFRelease(m_coreAudiodDictionary);
    if (m_authorizationRef)
            AuthorizationFree(m_authorizationRef, kAuthorizationFlagDestroyRights);
}

void ScopedAudioServiceStopper::stop()
{
    m_coreAudiodDictionary = SMJobCopyDictionary(kSMDomainSystemLaunchd, CFSTR("com.apple.audio.coreaudiod"));
    if (!m_coreAudiodDictionary) //means daemon is not started
            return;

    if (errAuthorizationSuccess != AuthorizationCreate(nullptr, kAuthorizationEmptyEnvironment, kAuthorizationFlagDefaults, &m_authorizationRef)) {
            m_authorizationRef = nullptr;
            return;
    }

    AuthorizationItem authItem          = { kSMRightModifySystemDaemons, 0, nullptr, 0 };
    AuthorizationRights authRights  = { 1, &authItem };
    AuthorizationFlags flags                =   kAuthorizationFlagDefaults                          |
                                                                            kAuthorizationFlagInteractionAllowed        |
                                                                            kAuthorizationFlagPreAuthorize                  |
                                                                            kAuthorizationFlagExtendRights;
    // Obtain the right to install our privileged helper tool (kSMRightModifySystemDaemons).
    if (errAuthorizationSuccess != AuthorizationCopyRights(m_authorizationRef, &authRights, kAuthorizationEmptyEnvironment, flags, nullptr)) {
            m_authorizationRef = nullptr;
            return;
    }

    CFErrorRef  cfError;
    if (!SMJobRemove(kSMDomainSystemLaunchd, CFSTR("com.apple.audio.coreaudiod"), m_authorizationRef, TRUE, &cfError)) {
            CFRelease(cfError);
    }
}

void ScopedAudioServiceStopper::start()
{
    if (!m_authorizationRef || !m_coreAudiodDictionary)
            return;

    CFErrorRef  cfError;
    if (!SMJobSubmit(kSMDomainSystemLaunchd, m_coreAudiodDictionary, m_authorizationRef, &cfError)) {
            CFRelease(cfError);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If the user is listening to music on the device are you sure they'd want you to forcibly stop it? It seems that displaying an alert requesting their action would be better. –  sbooth Mar 29 '14 at 12:39
    
killing coreaudiod just to have an exclusive access to the audio looks horribly bad, IMHO. Have you played with the "Hog mode" ? This looks design for that. –  Frédéric DJ Mar 31 '14 at 12:55

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