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Alex Poole posted a brilliant solution to another user's issue at Oracle formatting date intervals but

Didn't make it clear earlier that while I have questions on what parts of Alex' original query do, the deisred goal is a result set showing roster entries by individuals in 14 day intervals. Understanding exactly what all parts of the query do is key to always to getting a good result. So much emphasis was placed on certain parts of the query and not enough on where I wanted to arrive. :)

In this part of the query, what does the divisor of 48 have to do with 30 minute intervals? Jokingly, it could be the new Secret of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) -- it's not 42 anymore but 48. :)

A co worker and I figured it might be for a 6-day work week (48 hours -- 6 8 hour days). Here is Alex' query, note that the object tbl_stat is located at the top of the post, not part of Alex' query per se, it was part of the poster's original question:

with tmp_tab as (
    select start_time + (level - 1)/48 as period_start,
        start_time + level/48 - interval '1' second as period_end
    from (
        select to_date(:start_time, 'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI:SS') start_time,
            to_date(:end_time, 'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI:SS') end_time
        from dual
    )
    connect by start_time + (level - 1)/48 < end_time
)
select to_char(tt.period_start, 'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI') dt,
    count(ts.track_datetime)
from tmp_tab tt
left join tbl_stat ts
on ts.track_datetime between tt.period_start and tt.period_end
group by tt.period_start
order by tt.period_start;

Tha'ts the whole query, but what does the interval " / 48" pertain to as far as setting up 30 minute intervals, etc:

select start_time + (level - 1)/48 as period_start,
    start_time + level/48 - interval '1' second as period_end

Thanks, hope that's not too inane a question but I really don't see what's what with it.

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1  
One hour is a day/24, so half an hour (30 minutes) is a day/48. –  Peter Lang Mar 28 '14 at 12:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The documentation on datetime/interval arithmetic explains:

You can use NUMBER constants in arithmetic operations on date and timestamp values, but not interval values. Oracle internally converts timestamp values to date values and interprets NUMBER constants in arithmetic datetime and interval expressions as numbers of days. For example, SYSDATE + 1 is tomorrow. SYSDATE - 7 is one week ago. SYSDATE + (10/1440) is ten minutes from now.

(That's perhaps slightly misleading; SYSDATE + 1 is the same time tomorrow...)

It's common to see 1/24 used to represent an hour in calculations, 1/(24*60) to represent a minute, and 1/(24*60*60) to represent a second. Some people prefer that format - or 1/86400 - while some prefer interval '1' second or numtodsinterval(1, 'SECOND'), but they all mean the same in the end.

As Peter Lang said, 1/48 represents half an hour, as a fraction of one day. 1/24 is an hour, so 1/(2*24) is half an hour; it's the same as (1/2)*(1/24) if that helps.

You can compare two dates to see the fractional difference:

select 1/48, to_date('12:30', 'HH24:MI') - to_date('12:00', 'HH24:MI') as diff
from dual

      1/48       DIFF
---------- ----------
.020833333 .020833333
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, Thanks! I realized also that LEVEL in this context is a DAY. therefore dividing it by 48 of course has to yield 30 minute intervals. My query is fully done and I just posted it. I think using NUMBER, according to your answer might have been a better approach but my query does work. So I have the intervals of the OT Roster, no matter how much larger it gets either or both ways, should someone prepend earlier data, etc. A good Thanks! is in order to you for the original post. It made my day. –  user1585204 Mar 28 '14 at 14:30

The query I need to get the intervals within the pay periods of an overtime roster is done and I'll share it.

Here is my Frankenstein, which now HAS life. A curious thing, though ... I took a post literally and originally had my WHERE predicate as:

WHERE TRIM(UPPER(TO_CHAR(TO_DATE(TT.PERIOD_END, 'DD/MM/YYYY' ), 'DAY'))) = 'SATURDAY'
    AND MOD(TT.PAY_PERIOD,2) <> 0

This curiously picked MONDAY PERIOD_END dates. I had to set the = to 'THURSDAY' to get Saturday dates. Well, taking out the un-needed TO_DATE() resolved this but I found it strange that it wigged out the way it did, offsetting what I was looking for by 2 days.

WITH TMP_TAB AS (
    SELECT 
        START_TIME + (LEVEL - 1) AS PERIOD_START
        ,START_TIME + LEVEL + INTERVAL '13' DAY AS PERIOD_END
        ,LEVEL AS PAY_PERIOD
    FROM (
        SELECT 
            TO_DATE
                (
            TO_CHAR(
                    (
                        SELECT 
                            CASE WHEN MOD(TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR((SELECT MIN(ENTERED_DT) FROM OVTR_LOG) + DT1,'J')),2) = 0 
                                THEN TRUNC((SELECT MIN(ENTERED_DT) FROM OVTR_LOG) + DT1 + 7) 
                                ELSE TRUNC((SELECT MIN(ENTERED_DT) FROM OVTR_LOG) + DT1) END AS FIRST_PPE_DT
                        FROM (SELECT 7 - TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(MIN(ENTERED_DT),'D')) AS DT1 FROM OVTR_LOG)
                    ),'DD/MM/YYYY'
                  ), 'DD/MM/YYYY'
                ) START_TIME
            ,TO_DATE
                (
            TO_CHAR(
                    (
                        SELECT 
                            CASE WHEN MOD(TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR((SELECT MAX(ENTERED_DT) FROM OVTR_LOG) + DT1,'J')),2) = 0 
                                THEN TRUNC((SELECT MAX(ENTERED_DT) FROM OVTR_LOG) + DT1 + 7) 
                                ELSE TRUNC((SELECT MAX(ENTERED_DT) FROM OVTR_LOG) + DT1) END AS MOST_RECENT_PPE_DT
                        FROM (SELECT 7 - TO_NUMBER(TO_CHAR(MAX(ENTERED_DT),'D')) AS DT1 FROM OVTR_LOG)
                    ),'DD/MM/YYYY'
                  ), 'DD/MM/YYYY'
                ) END_TIME
        FROM DUAL
    )
    CONNECT BY START_TIME + (LEVEL -1) < END_TIME
)
SELECT 
    TO_CHAR(TT.PERIOD_START, 'DD/MM/YYYY') PERIOD_START
    ,TO_CHAR(TT.PERIOD_END, 'DD/MM/YYYY') PERIOD_END 

FROM TMP_TAB TT
--LEFT JOIN TO THE OTR
--ON WHATEVER

WHERE TRIM(UPPER(TO_CHAR(TT.PERIOD_END, 'DAY'))) = 'SATURDAY'
    AND MOD(TT.PAY_PERIOD,2) <> 0

GROUP BY 
    TT.PERIOD_START
    ,TT.PERIOD_END

ORDER BY TT.PERIOD_START

This gives the following result set. My apologies for not being "in complete form" here -- as Alex suggested the help centre should be reviewed and it will be.

The original question included I had was what does / 48 do? It divides LEVEL according to the context LEVEL is used in, straight and simple.

Here is what I originally wanted as a result set and with the great help of Alex' query (thanks to Peter's original question) I got there. This should explain where I was trying to arrive.

PERIOD_START    PERIOD_END
23/04/2011  07/05/2011
07/05/2011  21/05/2011
21/05/2011  04/06/2011
04/06/2011  18/06/2011
18/06/2011  02/07/2011
02/07/2011  16/07/2011
16/07/2011  30/07/2011
30/07/2011  13/08/2011
13/08/2011  27/08/2011
27/08/2011  10/09/2011
10/09/2011  24/09/2011
24/09/2011  08/10/2011
08/10/2011  22/10/2011
22/10/2011  05/11/2011
05/11/2011  19/11/2011
19/11/2011  03/12/2011
03/12/2011  17/12/2011
17/12/2011  31/12/2011
31/12/2011  14/01/2012
14/01/2012  28/01/2012
28/01/2012  11/02/2012
11/02/2012  25/02/2012
25/02/2012  10/03/2012
10/03/2012  24/03/2012
24/03/2012  07/04/2012
07/04/2012  21/04/2012
21/04/2012  05/05/2012
05/05/2012  19/05/2012
19/05/2012  02/06/2012
02/06/2012  16/06/2012
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know what you mean by "CONNECT BY ... INTERVAL DAY -- 101". I can't immediately tell what you're trying to achieve here - you seem to be creating half-hour periods which end two weeks before they start, which is odd... But if you need help with that you should ask a new question explaining what you're doing and what isn't working; please don't post a supplementary question as an answer, even to your own question. –  Alex Poole Mar 28 '14 at 13:01
    
This still isn't an answer to the question you asked... at least after the first sentence, and that's really just echoing Peter's comment. I realise you haven't been very active in the time you've been a member, so it might be worth looking through the help centre to see how questions and answers work here. –  Alex Poole Mar 28 '14 at 14:55
    
I was looking for some documentation giving a more full education on the topic. I just found out about using CONNECT BY ... LEVEL Friday. Having some docs to round out the education on it is fine but experience does the same thing. Just posted the query that gives me what I need -- 14 day intervals starting from the earliest ending date on record (23 April 2011) to the most recent ending date, filtering out the even numbered items from the result set. I started with your query where you helped another person get his 30 minute intervals. missing for me at first was what LEVEL related to. –  user1585204 Mar 28 '14 at 15:28

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