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I'm currently looking at other search methods rather than having a huge SQL query. I saw elasticsearch recently and played with whoosh (a Python implementation of a search engine).

Can you give reasons for your choice(s)?

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closed as not constructive by Bragboy, Mark, fancyPants, Monolo, andrewsi Sep 21 '12 at 16:45

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Sphinx vs Solr comparison: stackoverflow.com/questions/1284083/… –  Mauricio Scheffer Feb 19 '10 at 23:57
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Lucene vs Solr: stackoverflow.com/questions/1400892/… –  Mauricio Scheffer Feb 19 '10 at 23:57
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Whoosh v. Solr: stackoverflow.com/questions/3226596/… –  Robert J. Mar 5 '13 at 14:11
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I realy do not understand people that close such a CONSTRUCTIVE question. Such questions are realy important... –  Gizzmo Jun 16 at 19:42

11 Answers 11

up vote 422 down vote accepted

As the creator of ElasticSearch, maybe I can give you some reasoning on why I went ahead and created it in the first place :).

Using pure Lucene is challenging. There are many things that you need to take care for if you want it to really perform well, and also, its a library, so no distributed support, its just an embedded Java library that you need to maintain.

In terms of Lucene usability, way back when (almost 6 years now), I created Compass. Its aim was to simplify using Lucene and make everyday Lucene simpler. What I came across time and time again is the requirement to be able to have Compass distributed. I started to work on it from within Compass, by integrating with data grid solutions like GigaSpaces, Coherence and Terracotta, but its not enough.

At its core, a distributed Lucene solution needs to be sharded. Also, with the advancement of HTTP and JSON as ubiquitous APIs, it means that a solution that many different systems with different languages can easily be used.

This is why I went ahead and created ElasticSearch. It has a very advanced distributed model, speaks JSON natively, and exposes many advanced search features, all seamlessly expressed through JSON DSL.

Solr is also a solution for exposing an indexing/search server over HTTP, but I would argue that ElasticSearch provides a much superior distributed model and ease of use (though currently lacking on some of the search features, but not for long, and in any case, the plan is to get all Compass features into ElasticSearch). Of course, I am biased, since I created ElasticSearch, so you might need to check for yourself.

As for Sphinx, I have not used it, so I can't comment. What I can refer you is to this thread at Sphinx forum which I think proves the superior distributed model of ElasticSearch.

Of course, ElasticSearch has many more features then just being distributed. It is actually built with cloud in mind. You can check the feature list on the site.

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26  
"You know, for search". +1 for Hudsucker Proxy. Also, I'm intrigued by the software ;) –  Shabbyrobe Dec 10 '10 at 9:51
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Also, the video was really well done. You should add some more of those! –  Shabbyrobe Dec 10 '10 at 10:12
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"As the creator of ElasticSearch ...", enough for +1. –  olanod Dec 4 '12 at 12:55
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Nice, I found that I can use elasticsearch free with heroku, opposed to using something like solr which costs money... –  andrewliu Oct 30 '13 at 19:02

We use Lucene regularly to index and search tens of millions of documents. Searches are quick enough, and we use incremental updates that do not take a long time. It did take us some time to get here. The strong points of Lucene are its scalability, a large range of features and an active community of developers. Using bare Lucene requires programming in Java.

If you are starting afresh, the tool for you in the Lucene family is Solr, which is much easier to set up than bare Lucene, and has almost all of Lucene's power. It can import database documents easily. Solr are written in Java, so any modification of Solr requires Java knowledge, but you can do a lot just by tweaking configuration files.

I have also heard good things about Sphinx, especially in conjunction with a MySQL database. Have not used it, though.

IMO, you should choose according to:

  • The required functionality - e.g. do you need a French stemmer? Lucene and Solr have one, I do not know about the others.
  • Proficiency in the implementation language - Do not touch Java Lucene if you do not know Java. You may need C++ to do stuff with Sphinx. Lucene has also been ported into other languages. This is mostly important if you want to extend the search engine.
  • Ease of experimentation - I believe Solr is best in this aspect.
  • Interfacing with other software - Sphinx has a good interface with MySQL. Solr supports ruby, XML and JSON interfaces as a RESTful server. Lucene only gives you programmatic access through Java. Compass and Hibernate Search are wrappers of Lucene that integrate it into larger frameworks.
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you raised an important notion that a search-engine must be adaptable. –  dzen Feb 16 '10 at 11:56
    
What about Xapian? –  cuh Apr 15 '11 at 8:07
    
I have never used Xapian. It looks like a fine search library whose features are on a par with Lucene's. Again, things that matter most are your application needs, the environment in which you want the search engine to run, your proficiency in the implementation language (C++ in Xapian search, with bindings to many other languages) and how customizable is the engine. –  Yuval F Apr 20 '11 at 7:52

I have used both Sphinx, Solr and Elasticsearch. Solr/elasticsearch are built on top of Lucene. It adds many common functionality: web server api, faceting, caching, etc.

If you want to just have a simple full text search setup, sphinx is a better choice.

If you want to customize your search at all, elasticsearch and solr are the better choices. They very extensible: you can write your own plugins to adjust result scoring.

Some example usages:

  • Sphinx: craigslist.org
  • Solr: Cnet, Netflix, digg.com
  • Elasticsearch: Foursquare, Github
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We use Sphinx in a Vertical Search project with 10.000.000 + of MySql records and 10+ different database . It has got very excellent support for MySQL and high performance on indexing , research is fast but maybe a little less than Lucene. However it's the right choice if you need quickly indexing every day and use a MySQL db.

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An experiment to compare ElasticSearch and Solr

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I've found this interesting comparison:

http://blog.socialcast.com/realtime-search-solr-vs-elasticsearch/

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The only elasticsearch vs solr performance comparison I've been able to find so far is here:

Solr vs elasticsearch Deathmatch!

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1  
that's a bad one. he does not present comments! see this discussion: groups.google.com/a/elasticsearch.com/group/users/browse_thread/… –  Karussell May 11 '11 at 14:21
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-1 because "My Your comment is awaiting moderation." and others too see the google groups link above –  Karussell May 26 '11 at 20:55
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-1 , more than a year later, no comments are allowed at that thread, I would seriously consider ignoring it completely. –  JAR.JAR.beans Jun 2 '13 at 19:51

Lucene is nice and all, but their stop word set is awful. I had to manually add a ton of stop words to StopAnalyzer.ENGLISH_STOP_WORDS_SET just to get it anywhere near usable.

I haven't used Sphinx but I know people swear by its speed and near-magical "ease of setup to awesomeness" ratio.

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Try indextank.

As the case of elastic search, it was conceived to be much easier to use than lucene/solr. It also includes very flexible scoring system that can be tweaked without reindexing.

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scoring can be tweek at runtime with solr too –  Karussell May 11 '11 at 14:22
    
now there is no indextank anymore –  Karussell Oct 14 '11 at 18:12
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LinkdenIn open sources IndexTank, github.com/linkedin/indextank-engine –  Özhan Düz Dec 22 '11 at 7:19

My sphinx.conf

source post_source_1 
{
    ### Why '_1','_2','_3' stuff ? Because sphinx has limit [4GB] per index file \
    ### so you must split index sources...

    type = mysql

    sql_host = localhost
    sql_user = xxx
    sql_pass = xxx
    sql_db =   xxx
    sql_port = 3306

    sql_query_pre = SET NAMES utf8
    ### Query before fething for indexing...

    sql_query = SELECT *, id AS pid, CRC32(slug) as slug_crc32 FROM hb_posts
    ### Custom fields can be set (slug_crc32)

    sql_attr_uint = pid  
    # my post ID

    # Why sphinx ? 

    sql_field_string = title
    sql_field_string = slug
    sql_field_string = content
    sql_field_string = tags
    # I can store string fields into RAM, what i want

    sql_attr_uint = category
    # my post category ID

    sql_attr_timestamp = date
    # my post int date 

    sql_attr_uint = views
    # my post int date

    sql_query_info_pre = SET NAMES utf8
    ### 'sql_query_info_pre' You must use .patch(s) (requires source [re]build) \
    ### OR source edit(C++) for UTF support for string fields 'sql_field_string'

    sql_query_info = SELECT * FROM my_posts WHERE id=$id
    # lets index...
}

index post_1 
{
    source = post_source_1 
    # My valid and declared source name

    path = /var/data/post
    # Where to locate index file(s) (Are you have SSD? :)

    charset_type = utf-8
    # Charset must be same for all...
}

Test script:

<?php

    $slug = $_GET["my_post_slug"]; # Or explode REQUEST URI etc...
//  $slug = preg_replace("/[a-z0-9\-_]/i","",$slug); # There is no SPX INJECTION yet :D

    $conf = getMyConf();

    ### new sphinx instance

    require "sphinxapi.php";

    $cl = New SphinxClient ();

    $cl->SetServer($conf["server"], $conf["port"]);
    $cl->SetConnectTimeout($conf["timeout"]);
    $cl->setMaxQueryTime($conf["max"]);

    ### new researching setup

    $cl->SetMatchMode(SPH_MATCH_FULLSCAN); 
    # I am not using sphinx as a only 'searching daemon', because i can use it as a 'database platform' directly...

    $cl->SetArrayResult(TRUE);

    $cl->setLimits(0,1,1); 
    # I am looking for only post, not searching a keyword...

    $cl->SetFilter("slug_crc32", array(crc32($slug)));
    # int > faster and safer than strings...

    $post = $cl->Query(null, "post_1");
    # Quering NULL: Give me result(s) by filtering all posts(SPH_MATCH_FULLSCAN) by my filters(slug_crc32,limits etc...)

    echo "<pre>";
    var_dump($post);
    echo "</pre>";

    exit("1");
?>

Result:

[array] => 
  "id" => 123,
  "title" => xxx,
  "content" => "yyy ÇÇ şşş İİÇ ĞŞÇŞİĞ <br> <p> asdasdasd </p> 123 .!?* ",
   ...
   and all of the defined attr. listing here... (including query time and total match count[limits not necessary] )

Query time:

0.001 sec.

MySQL query and time (one query at the same time):

"SELECT * FROM my_posts WHERE id = 123123;" => 0.032 sec.

Mysql query and time (Under stress and 10000 query at the same time via 10 worker):

"SELECT * FROM my_posts WHERE id = 123123;" 
=> 2.117 sec. (average)
=> 3.021 sec. (average of last 10 query)

Sphinx query(above) and time (One query at the same time):

0.001 sec.

Sphinx query(above) and time (Under stress and 10000 query at the same time via 10 worker):

=> 0.346 sec. (average)
=> 0.260 sec. (average of last 10 query)

So now, I have 8gb ram and intel x e3x4 processor +3m posts +12m tags. MySQL clustering? No, I am happy with Sphinx (stability first, speed second, simplicity third)...

No more mysql_connect :D

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Did you tried sphinx or elasticsearch ? –  dzen May 2 '12 at 12:34
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@dzen this IS sphinx; he's using mysql query as a comparison of query execution speeds. –  mr.b Sep 13 '12 at 20:03

I would recommend DBSight. You just use the free version during your development cycle. It's built-in SQL crawler would save you lots of time to configure crawling. And many other features, like generating search results via scaffolding, etc.

http://www.dbsight.net

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