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The following is a part of my program trying to implement 'squeeze' or '-s' of 'cat' command using c. Now the main function uses argv and argc, which are analysed by using getopt function.'squeeze' function is called in main and 'stdin' and 'stdout' are passed as arguments. also the return type of getopt function is passed in writeLineNumbers. I am just wondering if this is the right way to do it?

void squeeze ( FILE *fin, FILE *fout, int writeLineNumbers)
{
    char line[len];
    //int linenumber=1;

    while (fgets(line,len,fin))
    {
        if(line==NULL)
            fin--=fin;
        if (fputs(line, fout)==EOF)
        {
            printf(stderr,"Write to stdout failed.");
            return;
        }
       // ++linenumber;
    }

}
share|improve this question
2  
You are misusing the printf function. According to the man, its first argument is a const char *. To write to a file descriptor (like stderr) using a function from the printf family, you should use dprintf. – Aliou Mar 28 '14 at 15:36
3  
line==NULL is always false, fgets doesn't modify line. And what is fin--=fin supposed to mean ? – Michael Walz Mar 28 '14 at 15:37
    
isn't fgets supposed to copy stuff from fin to line? – user3446270 Mar 28 '14 at 15:39
4  
The fin-- = fin; line is weird (and undefined behaviour). – Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '14 at 15:44
2  
The squeeze option basically looks for consecutive sequences of two or more newlines and only emits two newlines when it encounters such a sequence. There's a considerable temptation to write the code in terms of getc(), which needn't be all that bad for performance (and correctness is more important than performance). If you use fgets(), you have to worry about whether you read the whole line (was the last character in the buffer a newline); otherwise, if your buffer is, say, 256 characters long, and you get to read a line of 255 characters plus newline, you could get a spurious newline. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '14 at 15:58

Try this :

   void squeeze (FILE *fin, FILE *fout, int writeLineNumbers)
    {
    char line[len] = {0};

    while (fgets(line, len, fin))
    {
        if(strlen(line) != 0)
        {
          if (fputs(line, fout) == EOF)
          {
            printf(stderr,"Write to stdout failed.");
            return;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
fgets() includes the newline, so strlen(line) won't be zero (it will be 1, usually). Better would be line[0] == '\n'. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '14 at 15:43
    
Do not see the need for if(strlen(line) != 0) - not that it hurts. Same with bzero(line, len); - why zero the array? – chux Mar 28 '14 at 15:43
    
Yes we need if(strlen(line) != 1) (not != 0), it's the whole point of the program. But correct bzero isn't needed. – Michael Walz Mar 28 '14 at 15:46
1  
@Michael Walz as call to fgets() can result in line with a strlen(line) of 0 (rare circumstances) or 1 (rarely without a '\n'), what is the if(strlen(line) != 1) trying to accomplish? Maybe what is needed is a call like IsStringOnlyWhiteSpace(line)? – chux Mar 28 '14 at 15:55
1  
@user3446270: you seem to be confused about argv. Your command line handling detects which file(s) to process, but the code opens each file in turn (unless it needs to read standard input), and then calls a function (squeeze() when -s is given) to process the file(s). The general structure of main() will be: (1) spot the options and set flags; (2) loop over the file names left over, or standard input if there is no file name, processing according to the flags set. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '14 at 16:01

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