Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to create a shell similar to bash, with redirection and pipes.

In my main(), I call a parser and then call the function below. The problem I am running into is the fact that when I run my shell, it outputs to the terminal correctly, but it does not output to the file correctly when using the >, 1>, or 2>.

For instance, if I call:

pwd > foo5.txt

I end up receiving:

> 
foo5.txt 

In the text file I write too as opposed to the stdout (for ">"/"1>") or stderr (for "2>") which I am trying to achieve.

This is my code to fork and create the child process:

pid_t create_process(char *part, int const pipes[][2], int pipenum)
{
  pid_t pid;         // Initialize variables/pointers/arrays.
  char *args[64];
  int argc=0, n;
  char *arg=strtok(part, " \t");
  //char const **filename = args;


  while(arg != NULL)
    {
      args[argc++]=arg;
      arg=strtok(NULL, " \t");
    }

  args[argc++]=NULL;

  pid = fork();     // Create Fork.

  if(pid == 0)
  {
  int m;

  if(pipes[pipenum][STDIN_FILENO] >= 0)
    dup2(pipes[pipenum][STDIN_FILENO], STDIN_FILENO); // FD 0.

  if(pipes[pipenum][STDOUT_FILENO] >= 0)
    dup2(pipes[pipenum][STDOUT_FILENO], STDOUT_FILENO); // FD 1.

  // Close all pipes.
  for(m=0; m<64; m++)
    {
      if(pipes[m][STDIN_FILENO] >= 0)
        close(pipes[m][STDIN_FILENO]);
      if(pipes[m][STDOUT_FILENO] >= 0)
        close(pipes[m][STDOUT_FILENO]);
    }

  char *filename;
  char *newargs[64];
  newargs[63] = NULL;
  int i = 0;
  int j = 0;
  for(i = 0; i<64; i++)
  {
    if (args[i] == ">")
      {
        i++;
        if (args[i] != NULL)
          {
            filename = args[i];
            int redir = open(filename, O_WRONLY | O_TRUNC | O_CREAT, S_IRUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IWGRP | S_IWUSR);
            dup2(redir, 1);
            close(redir);
          }
      }
    else if (args[i] == "2>")
      {
        i++;
        if (args[i] != NULL)
          {
            filename = args[i];
            int redir = open(filename, O_WRONLY | O_TRUNC | O_CREAT, S_IRUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IWGRP | S_IWUSR);
            dup2(redir, 2);
            close(redir);
          }
      }

   else if (args[i] == "2>")
      {
        i++;
        if (args[i] != NULL)
          {
            filename = args[i];
            int redir = open(filename, O_WRONLY | O_TRUNC | O_CREAT, S_IRUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IWGRP | S_IWUSR);
            dup2(redir, 2);
            close(redir);
          }
      }
    else if (args[i] == 0)
      {
        break;
      }
    else
      {
        newargs[j] = args[i];
        j++;
        cout<<"The arg is: " << newargs[j] <<endl;
      }
  }

    execvp(newargs[0], newargs);
    fprintf(stderr, "Command not found.\n");
    exit(255);

  }

else if(pid < 0)
{ // Error checking.
  fprintf(stderr, "Fork Failed\n");
}

return(pid);
}

UPDATE: Now my code will not recognize the commands, and the arguments being printed (for error checking) appear as such:

ls > foo5.txt 
The arg is: fprintf 
The arg is: 
The arg is: ▒ 
Command not found.
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I see a few problems here:

First, you have the for loop where you scan the command arguments for redirection syntax (if (strcmp(args[i],">")==0) and so on) - but if the condition is true (meaning you found a redirection character) you're always opening args[2], not args[i+1].

Second (and this is why the redirection syntax gets passed on to the command you're running as command arguments) - once you detect redirection syntax, you don't remove the redirection operator or the target filename from the list of arguments that you pass to execvp().

For instance, if args[] = {"echo", "a", ">", "logfile", 0}, your code detects a request to send the output to a new file called "logfile" and redirects the FDs correctly, but it still passes those three arguments ["a", ">", "logfile"] to the command.

Third - in your loop, you're calling execvp() at the end of each conditional statement - meaning that you don't get to the end of argument processing before you launch the new process. You need to process all the command arguments for shell syntax and then exec the command.

To fix the various problems with arg handling, probably the most effective solution is to build a new argument list as you're processing the raw ones provided by the user. For instance (using a==b as a string equality test for brevity)

if (args[i] == ">")
{
   i++; //skip the arg
   if (args[i]) {  // check we haven't hit the end of the arg list
      filename = args[i];
      // then open the file, dup it to stdout or whatever, etc...
}
else if (args[i] == "<") // repeat for other redirection syntax...
else {    // Finally, handle the case where we didn't identify any shell syntax:
   newargs[j] = args[i]; // Copy the arg to the new list, since it isn't "special"
   j++;  // Size of newargs[] has been increased
}

Note that this still doesn't handle things like no whitespace around the ">" character: "echo foo>file" will just print "foo>file"... Syntax processing gets a little more complicated in that case, as you've got to account for quoting rules and escape characters to process the arguments correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
So I have followed your guidance (and your suggestions make a lot of sense) but I am still running into the issue where nothing is being written to the filename. I have updated the main post with the revised code. –  user2817692 Mar 28 '14 at 17:46
    
You've still got execvp() inside the for loop. That means on the first loop iteration, it will process the first one (or two) elements in args[], possibly adding something to newargs[] and possibly not - and then immediately call execvp(), preventing execution of the rest of the loop. Also remember you need to format newargs[] the same way as args[] - be sure there's a null as the last element (and stop the for loop any time args[i]==0) then call execvp() after the loop. –  tetsujin Mar 28 '14 at 18:19
    
I have updated the code again, but instead of getting more errors with the writing to files, now I'm just getting errors with calling the commands. I think it has to do with the 'break' I invoke when (args[i] == 0)... I'm not sure of a better way to escape the for loop but I'm having a strange error when I call the function now. To see that my newargs are being collected properly, I am receiving this: ls > foo5.txt The arg is: fprintf The arg is: The arg is: ▒ Command not found. I can post the rest of my code if need be because I have no idea of the cause. –  user2817692 Mar 28 '14 at 18:48
    
Oh and the error code at the end of the comment is difficult to read, so I added it to the main post so it's easier to read. –  user2817692 Mar 28 '14 at 18:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.