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Consider this x set of dates:

set.seed(1234)
x <- sample(1980:2010, 100, replace = T)
x <- strptime(x, '%Y')
x <- strftime(x, '%Y')

The following is a distribution of the years of those dates:

> table(x)
x
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1994 
   4    4    3    3    6    4    3    4    5   12    1    1    1    2 
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 
   9    4    2    1    4    4    2    1    4    1    4    3    4    3 
2010 
   1 

Now say I want to group them by decade. For this, I use the cut function:

> table(cut(x, seq(1980, 2010, 10)))
Error in cut.default(x, seq(1980, 2010, 10)) : 'x' must be numeric

Ok, so let's force x to numeric:

> table(cut(as.numeric(x), seq(1980, 2010, 10)))

(1.98e+03,1.99e+03]    (1.99e+03,2e+03]    (2e+03,2.01e+03] 
                 45                  28                  23 

Now, as you can see, the row.names of that table are in scientific format. How do I force them to not be in scientific notation? I've tried wrapping that whole command above inside format, formatC and prettyNum, but all those do is format the frequencies.

share|improve this question
3  
cut has an argument called dig.lab. –  joran Mar 28 '14 at 17:09
1  
Are you sure you used set.seed() here? I don't get the same results as you do. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 28 '14 at 17:14
    
You can just do floor(x/10)*10 –  Julián Urbano Mar 28 '14 at 17:15
    
@AnandaMahto, you're right, I wrote it here and forgot to use it in my R session. :$ Updating. –  Waldir Leoncio Mar 28 '14 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Thanks joran for pointing the path to the answer. I'll elaborate it here for the record:

Changing cut's dig.lab parameter from the default 3 to 4 solved this particular mockup as well as my real problem:

> table(cut(as.numeric(x), seq(1980, 2010, 10), dig.lab = 4))

(1980,1990] (1990,2000] (2000,2010] 
         45          28          23 

By the way, in order for 1980 to be counted one should include the include.lowest argument:

> table(cut(as.numeric(x), seq(1980, 2010, 10), dig.lab = 4, include.lowest = T))

[1980,1990] (1990,2000] (2000,2010] 
         49          28          23 

Now it sums to 100! :)

share|improve this answer
    
Note that this gives you wrong values. First, using 1980 as lower limit doesn't work because the value 1980 will not be included in any of cut's groups because it is exclusive; it gives you NA. Second, a decade formally would go from 1980 to 1989 both inclusive, which is not what you get here. –  Julián Urbano Mar 28 '14 at 17:21
    
I've just noticed that too, Julián; using include.lowest = T solves the problem. You're right about the decade division, I'm just not worried about that right now. –  Waldir Leoncio Mar 28 '14 at 17:23
    
Consider using just floor(as.numeric(x)/10)*10 or as.numeric(x)-as.numeric(x)%%10 –  Julián Urbano Mar 28 '14 at 17:26

This doesn't exactly answer the question you asked, but shows you a possible alternative: use the fact that there is a cut.Date method:

set.seed(1234)
x <- sample(1980:2010, 100, replace = T)
x <- strptime(x, '%Y')
out <- table(cut(x, "10 years"))
out
# 
# 1980-01-01 1990-01-01 2000-01-01 2010-01-01 
#         48         25         26          1 

Here, we also get what I would consider the "correct" values for each bin.


As a crude justification of my statement about "correct" values, consider the values we get when we manually calculate based on table:

y <- strftime(x, '%Y')
Tab <- table(y)
Tab
# y
# 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1994 1995 1996 
#    4    4    3    3    6    4    3    4    5   12    1    1    1    2    9    4 
# 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2010 
#    2    1    4    4    2    1    4    1    4    3    4    3    1 
sum(Tab[grepl("198", names(Tab))])
# [1] 48
sum(Tab[grepl("199", names(Tab))])
# [1] 25
sum(Tab[grepl("200", names(Tab))])
# [1] 26
sum(Tab[grepl("201", names(Tab))])
# [1] 1
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, thanks for bringing that up! Using strptime really adds 03-28 (today's March 28th) to the given year, instead of the 01-01 I thought it should. Your more elegant solution will probably come in handy in my future, but brute-forcing x to numeric yields easier-to-interpret row names (at least IMHO). –  Waldir Leoncio Mar 28 '14 at 17:30
    
@WaldirLeoncio, no problem. Hopefully it comes in handy. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 28 '14 at 17:34

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