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I'm trying to understand why this code works. Specifically,

1.In the method definition for compose, why do you have to create a new Proc? Why can't you call proc2 and proc1 without creating a new proc?

2.I tried creating the function 'double_then_square' but it only works as an assignment. Is that the case because you can't have methods within methods? Wouldn't recursion be a counterexample of that though or is the rule that you can't have different methods within methods?

def compose(proc1, proc2)
    Proc.new do |x|
        proc2.call(proc1.call(x))
    end
end

square_it = Proc.new do |n|
    n ** 2
end

double_it = Proc.new do |n|
    n * 2
end


double_then_square = compose(double_it,square_it)
puts double_then_square.call(1)
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It would help if you described how you tried to create the double_then_square function you said. Also, try to expand a bit on how you think recursion relates to this. –  Renato Zannon Mar 28 at 23:00
    
Also, one more question: Why are you using ruby in particular to learn these concepts? Ruby is a bit quirky when it comes to functional programming patterns (blocks, methods, procs, lambdas and their small differences), because it is a strongly OO language. Python or javascript might be better choices for this –  Renato Zannon Mar 28 at 23:01
    
My questions from before were answered. I only used Ruby because that is the guide that I've been following. Do you think it's necessary to switch languages to get an understanding of these concepts? –  user2469211 Mar 28 at 23:07
1  
No, not at all, ruby does have them. It's just that it doesn't lend itself to them as easily, you'll constantly bump into essentially OO. Python, Javascript and Ruby all are all multi-paradigm, but Python and Javascript are more biased towards FP, and Ruby towards OOP. –  Renato Zannon Mar 28 at 23:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Because that would execute this immediately when you define double_then_square, clearly not possible since we don't know that 1 is getting passed in yet. Instead, you want something you can call, e.g., send a .call(1) on. That is, we want to return a Proc.

  2. No, it should be doable. However, you will not be able to access your local variables, so you will have to define them in the method instead. Since it is a proper method, you will also call it directly instead of using .call. The code below works for me.


def double_then_square(*args)
  square_it = Proc.new do |n|
    n ** 2
  end

  double_it = Proc.new do |n|
    n * 2
  end
  compose(double_it,square_it).call(*args)
end
double_then_square(1)
# 4
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