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I have this code:

try {
    do_stuff();
    return do_more_stuff();
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
} catch (ProtocolException e) {
    throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
} catch (MalformedURLException e) {
    throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
} catch (SocketTimeoutException e) {
    throw new CustomException(e);
} catch (IOException e) {
    throw CustomException.unexpected_error(e);
}

I now need to have all those catch blocks in another similar function. What is the best way to avoid duplication here?

Note that the code inside the two try blocks is not very similar.

Also I can't really put the set of catches higher up.

Note, I'd prefer to avoid:

try {
    do_stuff();
    return do_more_stuff();
} catch (Exception e) {
    handle_exception_via_rtti(e);
}
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why do you want to avoid the rtti version? –  clamp Feb 16 '10 at 12:14
    
As dpb says "If your code just catches Exception, and the do_stuff and do_more_stuff later add extra checked exceptions, you'll probably never know about the change and the fact that your code could now be wrong." –  mxcl Feb 16 '10 at 12:27
1  
Personally, I'd just have your method throw the original exceptions. You don't do much with your catch blocks to 'handle' anything except wrapping in a CustomException. What value is that adding? –  duffymo Feb 16 '10 at 12:29
    
These two functions are used heavily. The new exception allows more descriptive error handling for users of my library in the context of the library's use thus allowing them to write more robust code. –  mxcl Feb 16 '10 at 12:33
    
I can't agree. An IOException is an IOException. There is just no point in wrapping it. Ditto a SocketTimeoutException. –  EJP Feb 16 '10 at 23:08
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Personally I'd try to make the

do_stuff();
return do_more_stuff();

part conform to a more general format in order to apply Strategy (as a pattern).

Then you can refactor all the places where you call this kind of block so that they can call a more generalized block (where the catches are laid out just once).

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1  
Indeed the strategy pattern will work here. For future generations, this would involve replacing do_stuff(); return do_more_stuff() with return strategy.do_stuff(). Thus you pass strategy to your exception handler function. This pattern would require all strategies to return the same type from do_stuff(); –  mxcl Feb 16 '10 at 12:31
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Note, I'd prefer to avoid:

Then either just live with it, or wait until JDK7 comes with Multicatch so that you can rewrite like:

try {
    do_stuff();
    return do_more_stuff();
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException | ProtocolException | MalformedURLException e) {
    throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
} catch (SocketTimeoutException e) {
    throw new CustomException(e);
} catch (IOException e) {
    throw CustomException.unexpected_error(e);
}

You can alternatively also move this into the constructor of CustomException and do a (nasty) global catch, but then you'll need to add a bunch of (nasty) if/else blocks to determine the type of the exception cause. All with all, I'd just prefer to stick with the way as you already did.

Update: another alternative is to split/refactor the lines which can potentially throw the exception as separate tasks into another method blocks throwing CustomException. E.g.

try {
    do_stuff_with_encoding();
    do_stuff_with_url();
    do_stuff_with_ws();
    // ...
    return do_more_stuff();
} catch (SocketTimeoutException e) {
    throw new CustomException(e);
} catch (IOException e) {
    throw CustomException.unexpected_error(e);
}

...

public SomeObject do_stuff_with_encoding() throws CustomException {
    try {
        do_stuff();
    } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
        throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
    }
}  

public SomeObject do_stuff_with_url() throws CustomException {
    try {
        do_stuff();
    } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
        throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
    }
}  

public SomeObject do_stuff_with_ws() throws CustomException {
    try {
        do_stuff();
    } catch (ProtocolException e) {
        throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
    }
}  
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1  
@BalusC: Unfortunately, that proposal was rejected: blogs.sun.com/darcy/entry/project_coin_final_five (Unless someone here can correct me on this..) –  Tim Feb 16 '10 at 12:15
1  
@Tim: It's now being reconsidered for inclusion blogs.sun.com/darcy/entry/projec_coin_post_devoxx_closures –  Ben Lings Feb 16 '10 at 12:32
    
@Ben: Thanks! I didn't know that. Let's hope they'll include it after all.. –  Tim Feb 16 '10 at 12:57
    
@Tim: let's really hope it. This has encountered me (although only a few) times as well. –  BalusC Feb 16 '10 at 13:05
    
FYI: the multicatch proposal made it into Java 7: download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/… –  BalusC Oct 25 '11 at 13:46
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It depends of why the do_stuff and do_more_stuff throw the checked exceptions. Are they doing that to force the user to treat the exception? If yes, then you trying to avoid:

try {
    do_stuff();
    return do_more_stuff();
} catch (Exception e) {
    handle_exception_via_rtti(e);
}

is a good thing.

If your code just catches Exception, and the do_stuff and do_more_stuff later add extra exceptions, you'll probably never know about the change and the fact that your code could now be wrong.

So you might have to deal with throwing the kitchen sink and treat all those exceptions, unless the methods could switch to unchecked exceptions.

On the other hand, if the methods are throwing checked exceptions just because the programmer was lazy in treating with them and just wanted to pass the buck, maybe you are looking at this from the wrong angle.

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Thanks your comment really helped me to appraise how I was approaching the problem. Indeed, I am avoiding throwing the kitchen sink, and I am not passing the buck. –  mxcl Feb 16 '10 at 12:35
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How about introducing a generic Action class that can be subclassed:

public class Action {
    public void runWithHandlers() throws Exception {
        try {
           run();
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
        } catch (ProtocolException e) {
            throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
        } catch (MalformedURLException e) {
            throw CustomException.programmer_error(e);
        } catch (SocketTimeoutException e) {
            throw new CustomException(e);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            throw CustomException.unexpected_error(e);
        }
    }
    public void run() throws Exception {
        // TODO subclasses of Action must implement this
    }
}

Then somewhere else in your code you instantiate one of the subclasses of Action and call runWithHandlers():

new MyAction().runWithHandlers();
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. But I'll give it to the guy who suggested the Strategy pattern I think. This is similar, and frankly I prefer it (it's simpler), but I think it's sensible to point other people towards something more readily named. –  mxcl Feb 16 '10 at 13:34
    
My solution actually has a name: It's the well-known Template method pattern, right from the GoF book :-) –  python dude Feb 16 '10 at 21:49
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If you can afford Scala, check it out: you can pattern match the exception in the catch block. See Scala for Java Refugees Part 4: Pattern Matching and Exceptions.

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