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Program below is a synchronization between two threads using a Mutex.

It compiles, works and prints what I want in order(alternating R/W for the 2 threads), but it crashes after it's done. Any idea why?

I think it has to do with closing TName handle, if I comment that part it doesn't crash, but I'd like to close opened handles.

HANDLE hMutex, hWriteDone, hReadDone;

int num, state;

void Writer()
{
    for(int x=10; x>=0; x--)
    {

        while (true)
        {

            if (WaitForSingleObject(hMutex, INFINITE) == WAIT_FAILED)
            {

                std::cout<<"In writing loop, no mutex!\n";

                ExitThread(0);
            }

            if (state == 0)
            {

                ReleaseMutex(hMutex);

                WaitForSingleObject(hReadDone, INFINITE);

                continue;
            }
            break;
        }
        std::cout<<"Write done\n";

        num= x;

        state= 0;

        ReleaseMutex(hMutex);

        PulseEvent(hWriteDone);
    }
}

void Reader()
{
    while(true)
    {

        if (WaitForSingleObject(hMutex, INFINITE) == WAIT_FAILED)
        {
            std::cout<<"In reader, no mutex!\n";

            ExitThread(0);

        }
        if (state == 1)
        {
            ReleaseMutex(hMutex);

            WaitForSingleObject(hWriteDone, INFINITE);

            continue;
        }

        if (num == 0)
        {

            std::cout<<"End of data\n";

            ReleaseMutex(hMutex);

            ExitThread(0);
        }
        else {

            std::cout<<"Read done\n";

            state=1;

            ReleaseMutex(hMutex);

            PulseEvent(hReadDone);

        }
    }
}

void main()
{

    HANDLE TName[2];
    DWORD ThreadID;

    state= 1;

    hMutex= CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL);
    hWriteDone= CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);
    hReadDone= CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, FALSE, NULL);

    TName[0]= CreateThread(NULL, 0,
        (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)Writer,
        NULL, 0, &ThreadID);

    TName[1]= CreateThread(NULL, 0,
        (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE)Reader,
        NULL, 0, &ThreadID);

    WaitForMultipleObjects(2, TName, TRUE, INFINITE);
    CloseHandle(TName);

    getchar();
}
share|improve this question
    
When you call WaitForSingleObject(), you should be checking for WAIT_OBJECT_0 instead of WAIT_FAILED. When dealing with mutexes, WaitForSingleObject() could return WAIT_ABANDONED, which you are not handling. –  Remy Lebeau Mar 29 at 18:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The lpStartAddress parameter of CreateThread is of type LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE. Which is a function pointer compatible with this signature:

DWORD WINAPI ThreadProc(LPVOID lpParameter);

So you need to supply what the function expects. Your function Reader does not fit the bill. Change its signature to be like this:

DWORD WINAPI Reader(LPVOID lpParameter)
{
    ....
}

And likewise for Writer.

Every time you cast something to suppress a compiler warning you are trading an easy to diagnose compile time error for a hard to diagnose run time error. That's a very bad trade. So, as a general rule, don't use casts. Sometimes you'll need to break that rule, but do so in full understanding of what you are doing.

Your main function also has a somewhat bogus signature. If you don't want to process arguments, then you should declare it like this:

int main()

Since you ignore the thread ID, you may as well pass NULL for the final parameter of CreateThread.

This also is wrong:

CloseHandle(TName);

The parameter of CloseHandle is of type HANDLE. You are passing a pointer to an array. You need to do this:

CloseHandle(TName[0]);
CloseHandle(TName[1]);

The Writer function does not return a value. The compiler warns you about that, if you enable sufficient warnings. You should certainly do so.

share|improve this answer
    
While this did work, my program still crashes. Even though this might've solved a problem, it didn't solve the original problem. –  George Irimiciuc Mar 29 at 17:20
    
I'm sorry that my answer is such a disappointment to you. You did fix both thread procedures? –  David Heffernan Mar 29 at 17:21
    
It's not. It seems that if I do CloseHandle(TName[0]); CloseHandle(TName[1]); it works. Why so? –  George Irimiciuc Mar 29 at 17:22
    
Updating OP with code. –  George Irimiciuc Mar 29 at 17:23
    
My answer deals with that too now. –  David Heffernan Mar 29 at 17:25

You should never cast a function pointer. Remove the (LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE) casts from your code, fix the compiler errors, and try again. Never use casts to quell compiler errors.

share|improve this answer
    
Why should I never cast a fct. pointer? I could do that, but I want to know why. –  George Irimiciuc Mar 29 at 17:09
    
Casting only tells the compiler to shut up, it doesn't actually fix anything. But what if the compiler's warnings are actually valid? If CreateThread wants a certain function signature, you must provide it. –  tenfour Mar 29 at 17:12
    
... and if you provide the wrong function signature, it can cause oddball crashes, often related to the stack. In this case your code probably crashes because your functions don't leave the stack in the state that CreateThread expects. –  tenfour Mar 29 at 17:15
1  
Windows passes the LPVOID parameter to your thread function. That's on the stack. When your thread returns it probably attempts to return to the wrong address: the parameter. –  ScottMcP-MVP Mar 29 at 18:52

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