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I was curious about the TransactionScope class.

For the most part, I assume it was intended for database connections (which is what I've used it for).

My question, is can you put any code in the using-block of a TransactionScope to make it transactional? MS documentation is not clear on this.

If it can be used to make code other than database connections transactional, which ones are supported? It would seem crazy to me if it could make System.IO.File operations transactional.

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"It would seem crazy to me if it could make System.IO.File operations transactional" - you can on Vista and later via TxF - check out alphafs.codeplex.com. –  Charles Jul 7 '11 at 2:19
    
A better question may be "which ones are automatically supported?" –  Joe Philllips Dec 4 '12 at 15:28
    
FYI, Microsoft is considering deprecating Transactional NTFS msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Nathan Jan 24 '13 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

TransactionScope is not only for the databases. Every component that implements IEnlistmentNotification interface can participate in two-phase commit of the transaction scope.

Here is an example of transactional in-memory storage: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/Transactional_Repository.aspx

Also, I'm not sure if there are components in .NET for transactional file IO, but it is pretty easy to implement such component - latest OS like Vista and Windows Server 2008 have support for transaction file IO.

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FYI, Microsoft is considering deprecating Transactional NTFS msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Nathan Jan 24 '13 at 16:44

No, you cannot make arbitrary code transactional by running it inside a TransactionScope.

As you noted in a comment, the System.Transactions namespace provides infrastructure classes to help make any resource transactional. By default, .NET provides resource manager support for several kinds of operations, listed in the namespace introduction you linked (in a comment): "SQL Server, ADO.NET, MSMQ, and the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC)."

It turns out, there is support for file system transactions - though I could only find it for NTFS (Enhance Your Apps With File System Transactions). For my money, that code could seriously use a façade, though. ;) Perhaps there are other, more generalized implementations out there (or perhaps not - making file IO transactional may require the extra infrastructure NTFS provides).

There's also a fair amount of ongoing research on making changes to in-memory state transactional, called software transactional memory. Microsoft DevLabs offers an implementation: STM.NET.

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That project seems to only support working with a transactional state in memory. This is far-off from support to making all code transactional (like System.IO I mention above). What does TransactionScope support besides database connections? –  jonathanpeppers Feb 16 '10 at 14:14
    
TransactionScope and Transactions are for databases - what else would they be used for? –  user195488 Feb 16 '10 at 14:20
    
This page mentions some other stuff: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.transactions.aspx, it talks about using it for other things besides databases (MSMQ) and the ability to implement a "Resource Manager". So can you implement something to make other things transactional? –  jonathanpeppers Feb 16 '10 at 14:27
    
@change for anything that may need to roll back. Ctrl-z, except triggered by one part of the transaction failing rather than user input. –  Will Feb 16 '10 at 14:29
    
@jon transactions aren't magic. You have to code not only what happens within the transaction but also how to undo what you've done. –  Will Feb 16 '10 at 14:30

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