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I've read the base64 python docs and seen examples here on SO and elsewhere, but I'm still having a problem decoding base64 back to the original binary representation.

I'm not getting any exceptions, so I don't think there's a padding or character set issue. I just get a resulting binary file that's smaller than the original binary.

I'm including both the base64 encoding and decoding steps in case there's an issue with either or both steps.

The code must run with python 2.7.

Below are the scripts that reproduce the problem.


b64_encode.py

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7

#
# b64_encode.py - must run with python 2.7
#               - must process data in chunks to limit memory consumption
#               - base64 data must be JSON compatible, i.e.
#                 use base64 "modern" interface,
#                 not base64.encodestring() which contains linefeeds
#

import sys, base64

def write_base64_file_from_file(src_fname, b64_fname, chunk_size=8192):
    with open(src_fname, 'rb') as fin, open(b64_fname, 'w') as fout:
        while True:
            bin_data = fin.read(chunk_size)
            if not bin_data:
                break
            print 'bin %s data len: %d' % (type(bin_data), len(bin_data))
            b64_data = base64.b64encode(bin_data)
            print 'b64 %s data len: %d' % (type(b64_data), len(b64_data))
            fout.write(b64_data)

if len(sys.argv) != 2:
    print 'usage: %s <bin_fname>' % sys.argv[0]
    sys.exit()

bin_fname = sys.argv[1]
b64_fname = bin_fname + '.b64'

write_base64_file_from_file(bin_fname, b64_fname)


b64_decode.py

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7

#
# b64_decode.py - must run with python 2.7
#               - must process data in chunks to limit memory consumption
#

import os, sys, base64

def write_file_from_base64_file(b64_fname, dst_fname, chunk_size=8192):
    with open(b64_fname, 'r') as fin, open(dst_fname, 'wb') as fout:
        while True:
            b64_data = fin.read(chunk_size)
            if not b64_data:
                break
            print 'b64 %s data len: %d' % (type(b64_data), len(b64_data))
            bin_data = base64.b64decode(b64_data)
            print 'bin %s data len: %d' % (type(bin_data), len(bin_data))
            fout.write(bin_data)

if len(sys.argv) != 2:
    print 'usage: %s <b64_fname>' % sys.argv[0]
    sys.exit()

b64_fname = sys.argv[1]
bin_ext = os.path.splitext(os.path.splitext(b64_fname)[0])[1]
bin_fname = os.path.splitext(b64_fname)[0] + bin_ext

write_file_from_base64_file(b64_fname, bin_fname)


For example, my output for a 19k image file is:

$ ./b64_encode.py img.jpg
bin <type 'str'> data len: 8192
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 10924
bin <type 'str'> data len: 8192
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 10924
bin <type 'str'> data len: 2842
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 3792

$ ./b64_decode.py img.jpg.b64 
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 8192
bin <type 'str'> data len: 6144
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 8192
bin <type 'str'> data len: 2048
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 8192
bin <type 'str'> data len: 4097
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 1064
bin <type 'str'> data len: 796

$ ll
19226 Feb  5 14:24 img.jpg
25640 Mar 29 12:12 img.jpg.b64
13085 Mar 29 12:14 img.jpg.jpg
share|improve this question
    
Any leading zeros would disappear when you encode to 64 and back. Eg. 0000001, 001 and 01 all encode to "1" in base 64. Decoding would give back "1" again. –  Asad Mar 29 '14 at 17:36
1  
@Asad: That's absolute and patent nonsense. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 29 '14 at 17:40
    
@MartijnPieters What do you mean? The number 1 can be represented in binary as any of 00001, 01, 1 etc. You can have any number of leading zeros you want. The base 64 representation is also 1, but I'm assuming it doesn't add an arbitrary number of leading zeros when you encode it, and similarly when you decode it to binary, there are no leading zeros. –  Asad Mar 29 '14 at 17:43
    
@Asad: this is not about binary numbers but about binary data; there is a huge difference there. You'd read '\x00' for a null byte, and that encodes to 'AA==' in Base64. Decoding 'AA==' gives you '\x00' again. Base64 doesn't lose leading zeros here. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 29 '14 at 17:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You do run into padding issues:

>>> open('pianoavatar.jpg').read(8192).encode('base64')[-5:]
'IIE=\n'

Base64 decoding stops when it encounters the = padding marker. Your second read finds such a marker at the 10924th character.

You need to adjust your chunk size to be divisible by 3 instead to avoid padding in the middle of your output file. Use a chunk size of 8190, for example.

When reading, you need to use a buffersize that's a multiple of 4 to avoid running into alignment issues as well. 8192 would do fine there, but you must ensure this restriction is met in your functions. You'd be better off defaulting to the the base64 expanded chunk size for the input chunks; 10920 for an encoding chunk size of 8190 (4 base64 characters for every 3 bytes encoded).

Demo:

>>> write_base64_file_from_file('pianoavatar.jpg', 'test.b64', 8190)
bin <type 'str'> data len: 8190
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 10920
bin <type 'str'> data len: 8190
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 10920
bin <type 'str'> data len: 1976
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 2636

Reading now works just fine, even at your original chunk size of 8192:

>>> write_file_from_base64_file('test.b64', 'test.jpg', 8192)
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 8192
bin <type 'str'> data len: 6144
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 8192
bin <type 'str'> data len: 6144
b64 <type 'str'> data len: 8092
bin <type 'str'> data len: 6068

You can force the buffersize to be aligned in your functions with a simple modulus:

def write_base64_file_from_file(src_fname, b64_fname, chunk_size=8190):
    chunk_size -= chunk_size % 3  # align to multiples of 3
    # ...

def write_file_from_base64_file(b64_fname, dst_fname, chunk_size=10920):
    chunk_size -= chunk_size % 4  # align to multiples of 4
    # ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Martijn! That's absolutely brilliant. I really appreciate your time and help showing the code changes and the explanations to go along with them. Working great now! :) –  nils Mar 29 '14 at 18:23

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