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I have a program that uses System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement.PrincipalContext to verify that the information a user entered in a setup screen is a valid user on the domain (the computer itself is not on the domain) and do some operations on the users of the domain. The issue is I do not want the user to need to enter his or her password every time they run the program so I want to save it, but I do not feel comfortable storing the password as plain-text in their app.config file. PrincipalContext needs a plain-text password so I can not do a salted hash as everyone recommends for password storing.

This is what I did

const byte[] mySalt = //It's a secret to everybody.
[global::System.Configuration.UserScopedSettingAttribute()]
public global::System.Net.NetworkCredential ServerLogin
{
    get
    {
        var tmp = ((global::System.Net.NetworkCredential)(this["ServerLogin"]));
        if(tmp != null)
            tmp.Password = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding().GetString(ProtectedData.Unprotect(Convert.FromBase64String(tmp.Password), mySalt, DataProtectionScope.CurrentUser));
        return tmp;
    }
    set
    {
        var tmp = value;
        tmp.Password = Convert.ToBase64String(ProtectedData.Protect(new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding().GetBytes(tmp.Password), mySalt, DataProtectionScope.CurrentUser));
        this["ServerLogin"] = value;
    }
}

Was this the right thing to do or is there a better way?

EDIT -- Here is a updated version based on everyone's suggestions

private MD5 md5 = MD5.Create();

[global::System.Configuration.UserScopedSettingAttribute()]
public global::System.Net.NetworkCredential ServerLogin
{
    get
    {
        var tmp = ((global::System.Net.NetworkCredential)(this["ServerLogin"]));
        if(tmp != null)
            tmp.Password = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(ProtectedData.Unprotect(Convert.FromBase64String(tmp.Password), md5.ComputeHash(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(tmp.UserName.ToUpper())), DataProtectionScope.CurrentUser));
        return tmp;
    }
    set
    {
        var tmp = value;
        tmp.Password = Convert.ToBase64String(ProtectedData.Protect(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(tmp.Password), md5.ComputeHash(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(tmp.UserName.ToUpper())), DataProtectionScope.CurrentUser));
        this["ServerLogin"] = tmp;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Who and what are you trying to defend the password from? –  SLaks Feb 16 '10 at 14:23
    
I would say 'proper' way would be keeping the Kerberos ticket, but I don't know how in this context, sorry. –  Maxwell Troy Milton King Feb 16 '10 at 14:26
1  
@Slaks - I am defending the password from bored coworkers who have sat down at someone else's computer. I just want to protect from the casual observer, not a determined hacker. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 16 '10 at 14:32
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of writing new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding(), you should write System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.

Also, I recommend using UTF8 instead.

Other than that, your code looks pretty good.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip about the other way to use the encoder. Why do you recommend UTF8 over ASCII? –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 16 '10 at 14:30
1  
So that passwords can contain Unicode characters. –  SLaks Feb 16 '10 at 14:35
    
Thanks, I will change it. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 16 '10 at 14:39
    
Joel's idea of using per-username salts is an excellent suggestion and I highly recommend it. –  SLaks Feb 16 '10 at 14:40
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For the salt, I'd do a transformation on the username (hash it) rather than share the same salt for everyone.

For something like this, I'd also look for a way to keep the existing session alive longer rather than saving the password to create new sessions.

share|improve this answer
    
The session is alive the entire instance the program is run, I just need to create the session with the server when the program starts, or did you mean keep the session alive between runs? –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 16 '10 at 14:38
    
You could use a service or other background program to hold the session and keep it alive longer. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 16 '10 at 14:43
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I like the JoelCoehoorn approach.

Use a value unique for the user machine as the password salt.

So it will be different in each deplyment ; ).

UPDATE: See this thread for ideas: How-To-Get-Unique-Machine-Signature

share|improve this answer
    
What is the same user logs on to different machines? It's got to be per-user. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 16 '10 at 14:42
    
Hi Joel thanks for asking : ) If the user change from pc to pc: he will need to enter its domain credentials again necessarily, before caching ; ) –  SDReyes Feb 16 '10 at 14:46
    
ProtectedData.Protect is already per-machine. –  SLaks Feb 16 '10 at 15:23
    
It can be either user or machine. that is what the last parameter DataProtectionScope is for. –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 16 '10 at 15:54
    
Yes, but since the machine isn't in a domain, even per-user will also be per-machine. –  SLaks Feb 16 '10 at 15:55
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