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I have a function like this.

(defun foo ()
  (if (condition)
     (do-something)))

But I want to write like this to avoid unnecessary indent.

(defun foo ()
  (if not (condition) (return))
  (do-something))

Obviously return isn't caught because there is no block here.

How can I get out of the function? Or is this a bad way with lisp?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Defun creates a block named for the function name, which can be used by calling return-from.

(return-from foo (do-something))

It's not good style to use this to avoid a little indentation. Your editor should be able to do indentation automatically, and functions are usually easier to read without early returns.

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I'd argue that "good style" isn't the main issue. That's too subjective in a short answer. Maybe what you mean by style is: since, in that case, the function returns automatically without having to call return-from explicitly, it's a better choice because it would make the code more concise. –  EuAndré Mar 31 at 19:37

@m-n already answered your question fully. I just want to provide an example of what 'good style' would be in this case:

(defun foo ()
  (when (condition)
    (do-something)))

In my opinion, it even does look better than

(defun foo ()
  (if (condition)
      (do-something)))

and in particular than

(defun foo ()
  (if (not (condition)) (return-from foo))
  (do-something))

(This is the indentation as my emacs with slime etc. produces it)

N.B.: Instead of (when (not (condition)) ...) use (unless (condition) ...).

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Can I ask why when is better than if in this case? –  ironsand Mar 31 at 11:26
    
when never has an else clause, thus using when makes ones intention clear that there is no 'else'. From a performance percpective it does not matter. when is a macro that expands to (if (condition) (do-something) nil) on at least SBCL. I don't know what the standard says. –  Philipp Matthias Schäfer Mar 31 at 13:09

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