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I have a nested dictionary of people and item ratings, with people as the key. people may or may not share items. Example:

{
 'Bob' : {'item1':3, 'item2':8, 'item3':6},
 'Jim' : {'item1':6, 'item4':7},
 'Amy' : {'item1':6,'item2':5,'item3':9,'item4':2}
}

I'm looking for the simplest way to flip these relations, and have a new nested dictionary with items as the key. Example:

{'item1' : {'Bob':3, 'Jim':6, 'Amy':6},
 'item2' : {'Bob':8, 'Amy':5},
 'item3' : {'Bob':6, 'Amy':9},
 'item4' : {'Jim':7, 'Amy':2}
}

What is the best way to do this? Is it possible with a comprehension?

share|improve this question
1  
Comprehensions are not necessarily always a good idea when in situations like these where readability counts. –  jathanism Feb 16 '10 at 15:55
    
@jathanism, very true. I'm still learning Python, and wasn't sure if there a cleaner, more 'pythonic' implementation of what I was trying to do. –  GSto Feb 16 '10 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

collections.defaultdict makes this pretty simple:

from collections import defaultdict
import pprint

data = {
 'Bob' : {'item1':3, 'item2':8, 'item3':6},
 'Jim' : {'item1':6, 'item4':7},
 'Amy' : {'item1':6,'item2':5,'item3':9,'item4':2}
}

flipped = defaultdict(dict)
for key, val in data.items():
    for subkey, subval in val.items():
        flipped[subkey][key] = subval

pprint.pprint(dict(flipped))

Output:

{'item1': {'Amy': 6, 'Bob': 3, 'Jim': 6},
 'item2': {'Amy': 5, 'Bob': 8},
 'item3': {'Amy': 9, 'Bob': 6},
 'item4': {'Amy': 2, 'Jim': 7}}
share|improve this answer
1  
The credit for the ease of this doesn't really go to defaultdict, IMHO, since it's really just as easy without it, just adding the line "flipped.setdefault(subkey, {})" –  Manganeez Nov 5 '13 at 1:53

I totally agree that Ryan Ginstrom's answer is the preferred way of doing this (for all practical purposes).

But since the question also explicitely asks:

Is it possible with a comprehension?

I thought I'd chime in with a quick example as for how to do this with a list comprehension (it could be a good example for showing how nested list comphrehensions can quickly decrease readability).

import itertools

d = {
 'Bob' : {'item1':3, 'item2':8, 'item3':6},
 'Jim' : {'item1':6, 'item4':7},
 'Amy' : {'item1':6,'item2':5,'item3':9,'item4':2}
}

print dict([(x, dict([(k, d[k][x]) for k,v in d.items() if x in d[k]])) 
            for x in set(itertools.chain(*[z for z in d.values()]))])
share|improve this answer
    
nice. it does look like a pretty hairy comprehension, but +1 for providing it. –  GSto Feb 16 '10 at 22:08
1  
This is better done with generator expressions, the iter* methods of dictionaries, and chain.from_iterable (new in 2.6). This way, only the set needs to be held in memory rather than a bunch of lists constructed temporarily. dict((x, dict((k, d[k][x]) for k,v in d.iteritems() if x in d[k])) for x in set(itertools.chain.from_iterable(d.itervalues()))) –  agf Aug 4 '11 at 14:25

This is easy enough to do (as others have shown), but depending on your needs you should also consider that for data with several pieces of information where you want to extract by any criterion, a database might be the best tool. The built-in sqlite3 module provides a low-overhead database that may, depending on what you are doing, serve you better than a nested dict.

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1  
this is true, and worth considering. But the data I get could come from a variety of sources (json, xml, db, etc) so I was looking at ways to approach things using language constructs instead of relying on the source. –  GSto Feb 16 '10 at 19:32

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