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Desperate times call for desperate measures.

I've been trying to follow this example (first hit on google for jersey + jetty) but with not much luck.

At the suggestion of the commenters below, I've decided to update the example to use the latest versions of Jetty (9.1.0.RC2) and Jersey (2.7).

Here is the updated pom with updated dependencies:

<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
<modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
<groupId>HelloJerseyLatest</groupId>
<artifactId>HelloJerseyLatest</artifactId>
<version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
<build>
    <sourceDirectory>src</sourceDirectory>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>3.1</version>
            <configuration>
                <source>1.7</source>
                <target>1.7</target>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>
<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.containers</groupId>
        <artifactId>jersey-container-servlet-core</artifactId>
        <version>2.7</version>
    </dependency>

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.eclipse.jetty</groupId>
        <artifactId>jetty-server</artifactId>
        <version>9.1.0.RC2</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.eclipse.jetty</groupId>
        <artifactId>jetty-servlet</artifactId>
        <version>9.1.0.RC2</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>
</project>

The first thing to notice is that Jersey packages have changed from com.sun.jersey.spi.* to org.glassfish.jersey.* As a result, the main method will need to be changed as well:

    package example.server;

    import org.eclipse.jetty.server.Server;
    import org.eclipse.jetty.servlet.ServletContextHandler;
    import org.eclipse.jetty.servlet.ServletHolder;

    //import com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer;
    import org.glassfish.jersey.servlet.ServletContainer;
    public class MinimalServerRest {

         public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
             ServletHolder sh = new ServletHolder(ServletContainer.class);

                     // these initialization strings will need to be updated.
             sh.setInitParameter("com.sun.jersey.config.property.resourceConfigClass", "com.sun.jersey.api.core.PackagesResourceConfig");
             sh.setInitParameter("com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages", "rest");//Set the package where the services reside
             sh.setInitParameter("com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature", "true");


             Server server = new Server(9999);
             ServletContextHandler context = new ServletContextHandler(server, "/", ServletContextHandler.SESSIONS);
             context.addServlet(sh, "/*");
             server.start();
             server.join();
          }
    }

what changes will be needed to update the original sample code to be current? I don't have a web.xml file. do I need one?

enter image description here

share|improve this question
1  
If you are just starting out, you should use the current version of Jersey, which is 2.7. It's not great that the top hit on google gives you jersey 1.18... See here for how to use Jersey with servlet container, and here for how to use Jersey with Jetty's HTTP Server –  Alden Mar 30 at 17:48
    
Do you need to use Jersey 1? Would 2 suffice? I'm not up for fixing a Jersey 1 example, but could provide a working Jetty / Jersey 2 example. –  Will Apr 12 at 10:04
    
Sure. I'm already upgrading to 2 but stuck again. I'll update question in a few hours in the morning –  MedicineMan Apr 12 at 12:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+100

I realise that this isn't getting the example you gave to work (your example link is broken) - I don't know Jersey 1 very well, and trying to upgrade someone else's project is difficult. As you have another question asking for a HelloWorld example, I assume you're just needing something to get yourself going with Jersey & Jetty.

So here you go - 2 examples, one using the JettyHttpContainerFactory and the other using the Jersey ServletContainer.

First the Jersey Resource - really simple. This sets the class with a path of "test", and one method with a path of hello, accepting GET which produces "Hello World" in plain text.

@Path("/test")
public class TestResource {

    @GET
    @Path("hello")
    @Produces(MediaType.TEXT_PLAIN)
    public String hello() {
       return "Hello World";
    }
}

Next the server class:

public class ExampleServer {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

            URI baseUri = UriBuilder.fromUri("http://localhost/").port(9998).build();
            ResourceConfig config = new ResourceConfig(TestResource.class);
            Server server = JettyHttpContainerFactory.createServer(baseUri, config);
       }
}

And finally the pom dependencies (note there are dependencies here for both examples).

       <dependencies>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.eclipse.jetty</groupId>
                <artifactId>jetty-server</artifactId>
                <version>9.1.3.v20140225</version>
            </dependency>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.eclipse.jetty</groupId>
                <artifactId>jetty-servlet</artifactId>
                <version>9.1.3.v20140225</version>
            </dependency>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.core</groupId>
                <artifactId>jersey-server</artifactId>
                <version>2.7</version>
            </dependency>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.containers</groupId>
                <artifactId>jersey-container-servlet-core</artifactId>
                <version>2.7</version>
            </dependency>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.containers</groupId>
                <artifactId>jersey-container-jetty-http</artifactId>
                <version>2.7</version>
            </dependency>
            <dependency>
                <groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.media</groupId> 
                <artifactId>jersey-media-moxy</artifactId> 
                <version>2.7</version> 
            </dependency>
            <!-- if you want to enable JSON support, include Moxy and Jersey will automatically enable the Feature -->

      </dependencies>

Also see https://jersey.java.net/apidocs/2.7/jersey/javax/ws/rs/core/Feature.html for an understanding of Features - by including Moxy on the classpath, Jersey will automatically register the MoxyJSONFeature. If you'd rather use Jackson, you'll need to manually register the JacksonFeature, as well as the dependency. You can register any feature, in the same init param as registering your resources (comma separated)

If you would prefer to configure as a servlet use this as the ExampleServer code

public class ExampleServer {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

            Server server = new Server(9998);

            ServletContextHandler context = new ServletContextHandler(ServletContextHandler.SESSIONS);
            context.setContextPath("/");

            server.setHandler(context);

            ServletHolder jerseyServlet = context.addServlet(org.glassfish.jersey.servlet.ServletContainer.class, "/*");
            jerseyServlet.setInitOrder(0);

            /*This parameter tells the Jersey Servlet which of your REST resources to load. In this example we're adding the TestResource class. Jersey will then invoke this class for requests coming into paths denoted by the @Path parameter within the TestResource class. If you have multiple classes, you can either list them all comma separated, of use "jersey.config.server.provider.packages" and list the package name instead */
            jerseyServlet.setInitParameter("jersey.config.server.provider.classnames", "foo.bar.TestResource");
            server.start();
            server.join();
       }
}

Note with the servlet version, I'm defining the class name of my resource. If you have a few it's best to provide the package name instead using jersey.config.server.provider.packages

Hope this helps. Let me know if you have any problems.

Will

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand the first parameter in this line: jerseyServlet.setInitParameter("jersey.config.server.provider.classnames", "foo.bar.TestResource"); what does it mean? can you point me to some docs where I can read a little more about this? –  MedicineMan Apr 13 at 1:35
    
Done - see the comment above the init param. Also see jersey.java.net/apidocs/2.7/jersey/org/glassfish/jersey/server/… –  Will Apr 13 at 6:12
    
Can't see your error, but have you read the relevant JSON section in the docs - jersey.java.net/documentation/2.7/user-guide.html#json You'll need to include the right dependency, and possibly register a feature. –  Will Apr 14 at 21:42
    
When I try to return a JSON object with @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON), I get the error: javax.servlet.ServletException: org.glassfish.jersey.message.internal.MessageBodyProviderNotFoundException: MessageBodyWriter not found for media type=application/json, type=class providers.Employee, genericType=class providers.Employee. I corrected it by adding the following to the POM: <dependency> <groupId>org.glassfish.jersey.media</groupId> <artifactId>jersey-media-moxy</artifactId> <version>2.7</version> </dependency> is this the correct way to resolve this? –  MedicineMan Apr 14 at 22:02
    
If it is the correct approach, would you mind editing your answer to include it in your POM? –  MedicineMan Apr 14 at 22:03

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