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I am supposed to be checking if a binary tree has the same structure as another tree using recursion. The part I am having trouble with is figuring out how to check at each level if there's a left or right side and comparing it to the other tree. Any kind of help would be appreciated thanks.

public  boolean hasSameStructureAs(BinaryTree tree){
     //If left and right are null they are still similar
    if(leftChild == null && rightChild == null);
        return true;
    if (leftChild == null && rightChild != null)
        return false;
    if (leftChild != null && rightChild == null){
        return false;

//I am having trouble with the recursion part of the code below, I think I have it partially correct

    if (!tree.equals(rightChild.left,leftChild.left )) return false;
    if (!tree.equals(rightChild.right, leftChild.right)) return false;

    return true;

Here are some of the constructors and get/set methods.

 public class BinaryTree {
private String data;
private BinaryTree leftChild;
private BinaryTree rightChild;

public BinaryTree(String d) {
    data = d;
    leftChild = null;
    rightChild = null;
}

public BinaryTree(String d, BinaryTree left, BinaryTree right) {
    data = d;
    leftChild = left;
    rightChild = right;
}

public String getData() {
    return data;
}

public BinaryTree getLeftChild() {
    return leftChild;
}

public BinaryTree getRightChild() {
    return rightChild;}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your BinaryTree is a recursive data structure, so you can do the check recursively by following the common approach when you write a recursive function - assuming that it's already written.

Here is what I mean: imagine that your BinaryTree class has a working hasSameStructureAs method that you could use only on children nodes. How would you check the current node with it?

  • Check the left subtrees of tree.getLeftChild() agains this.leftChild; if hasSameStructureAs returns false, return false as well. If both left subtrees are null, continue checking
  • Check the right subtrees of tree.getRightChild() agains this.rightChild; if hasSameStructureAs returns false, return false as well. If both right subtrees are null, or hasSameStructureAs returned true, return true as well.

That's it - you are done! All your method needs to do is to null check its left and right subtrees, and call hasSameStructureAs on them.

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Thanks for making it very clear, your very good! –  user3450909 Mar 30 '14 at 0:59

I would need to see your .equals method to be absolutely certain, but it would appear that you're not doing it recursively. If you want it to be recursive, if both trees have a left child or both have a right child (or both) return that method recursively, passing those children as the new "roots" to check their children at.

If there is any point where they don't match, return false. If you've reached a point where all the children are leaves (null children) return true.

Other than that, it's as simple as making the method pre-order recursive. (visit parent -> visit left child, if any -> visit right child, if any, repeat process each time you visit a child).

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Assuming that you haven't overridden equals, this:

if (!tree.equals(rightChild.left,leftChild.left )) return false;

Won't do what you want. The default implementation of equals() just returns (this == other), and that's only true if they are the exact same object (i.e. at the same location in memory).

You actually don't have any recursion yet. Recursion means that the function calls itself. Consider that the left and right children are also trees. You already have a method hasSameStructureAs, that, when finished, will return true for trees of equal structure. Thus, your solution should incorporate calling hasSameStructureAs() on the left and right children of the two trees, and composing the value obtained from each "side".

In general, the strategy for recursive problems is to break it down into a recursive case and one or more base cases. With a tree structure, your base cases will involve the leaves. A leaf in your tree is a node where the child links are null.

Imagine you have a boolean value for temporarily storing whether the left side is equal.

  • if both this.leftChild and other.leftChild are null, leftEq is true
  • if only one of them is null, leftEq is false
  • otherwise leftEq is this.leftChild.hasSameStructure(other.leftChild)

You would do the same for rightEq and then return leftEq AND rightEq.

Personally I think that one of the things that makes this tricky to think about is that your hasSameStructure is written from the point of view of one of the trees. Maybe think about how you would solve it with an outside method hasSameStructure(treeA, treeB) and then translate that into what's actually being asked for.

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Clue #1: Your method is called "hasSameStructureAs". For it to be recursive, it needs to call "hasSameStructureAs".

Clue #2: Your code is passed a parameter called "tree" but you aren't even looking at it.

Suggestion: Rename BinaryTree to Node (since it's a Node that has children, not a tree), and rename the "tree" parameter to "that", and then explicitly use "this" to access fields on the "this" object, so that you can see what belongs to "this" vs. "that":

public boolean hasSameStructureAs(Node that)
    {
    // first, only bother to check if the children are different at all
    // (if they are both null, for example, then they will be equal)
    if (this.leftChild != that.leftChild)
        {
        // second, since we already know that they are unequal, if either
        // one of them is null, then the data structure is unequal
        if (this.leftChild == null || that.leftChild == null)
            {
            return false;
            }

        // third, since neither one is null, let's recursively ask them if
        // they are the same
        if (!this.leftChild.hasSameStructureAs(that.leftChild))
            {
            return false;
            }
        }
    // and so on ..

Also, since this is probably a homework assignment, you really need to learn to figure some of it out on your own.

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Had the same question on an assignment, this is how I did it, probably not the most efficient but the results are accurate

public boolean hasSameStructureAs(BinaryTree tree){


    if(tree.getLeftChild() == null && this.getLeftChild() == null) {
        if(tree.getRightChild() == null && this.getRightChild() == null) {
            return true;}}

    if(tree.getLeftChild() == null && this.getLeftChild() == null) {
        if(tree.getRightChild() != null && this.getRightChild() != null) {
            return this.getRightChild().hasSameStructureAs(tree.getRightChild());}}

    if(tree.getLeftChild() != null && this.getLeftChild() != null) {
        if(tree.getRightChild() != null && this.getRightChild() != null) {
            return this.getRightChild().hasSameStructureAs(tree.getRightChild()) &&   this.getLeftChild().hasSameStructureAs(tree.getLeftChild());}}

    if(tree.getLeftChild() != null && this.getLeftChild() != null) {
        if(tree.getRightChild() == null && this.getRightChild() == null) {
            return this.getLeftChild().hasSameStructureAs(tree.getLeftChild());}}


    return false;



 }
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