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This is the less I am using:

less 458 (POSIX regular expressions)
Copyright (C) 1984-2012 Mark Nudelman

In Vim it is \< and \>, in most other regex it is \b.

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What's the output of ldd /usr/bin/less (presupposing that's the correct path)? –  tripleee Mar 30 at 11:18
    
I don't have ldd (this is OS X) –  Steven Lu Mar 30 at 18:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your version of less was built with posix regular expressions, as if:

wget http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/less/less-451.tar.gz
tar zxf less-451.tar.gz
cd less-451
./configure --with-regex=posix
make

However, apparently the cause of whether \< works or not does NOT depend on this:

  • In Debian/Linux, \< will work fine even if you build with the above commands, with posix regex
  • In Mac OS X, I tried all possible values of --with-regex except pcre, and \< doesn't work with any of them. If I build with pcre, then \b works, instead of \<.

To conclude, I don't know how to make it work with \<. But you can build yourself with pcre and then it should work with \b. If you are not a sysadmin, you probably want to use a --prefix to install under your home directory, for example --prefix=$HOME/opt. After the make step, confirm it works with ./less /path/to/some/file. If looks good, then finish with make install.

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less generally uses vi syntax, i.e. \< and \> unless it has been compiled with the --with-regex=none configure option or if the regular expression library found at compilation time doesn't provide word boundary search. Your system might also provide a different syntax.

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No, it's not working. –  Steven Lu Mar 30 at 8:37
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Answer updated, you should tell what OS your are using as the behavior is platform dependent. –  jlliagre Mar 30 at 9:03

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