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I am quite new with C# programming and know very little about serial ports. I am following this method provided by Microsoft to continuously read information entering multiple serial ports. Overall, my application is to bring data in from multiple COM ports and perform computational tasks on the resulting data.

1) I want to use multiple serial ports. Unfortunately, I do not currently have enough USB-RS232 adapters to test multiple ports. I am not sure if creating a second DataReceivedHandler method is the correct way to do this. This is what I currently have:

// Receive data on COM Port A
private static void DataReceivedHandlerA(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    SerialPort sp = (SerialPort)sender;
    string inDataA = sp.ReadExisting();
}

// Receive data on COM Port B
private static void DataReceivedHandlerB(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    SerialPort spB = (SerialPort)sender;
    string inDataB = spB.ReadExisting();
}

2) Using the received data from within the DataReceivedHandler method elsewhere in the Main() loop. Since the method is private, I am not able to use the inDataA within the Main() loop. Whenever I make this method public, it seems to fail. I want to be able to return the string inDataB. Is this possible, or is there another better way to do this.

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2 Answers 2

Any reason you can't have those two variables as global ones outside of main so they are available to all functions?

Static String inDataA, inDataB;

// Receive data on COM Port A
private static void DataReceivedHandlerA(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    SerialPort sp = (SerialPort)sender;
    inDataA = sp.ReadExisting();
    Console.Write(inDataA);
}

// Receive data on COM Port B
private static void DataReceivedHandlerB(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    SerialPort spB = (SerialPort)sender;
    inDataB = spB.ReadExisting();
    Console.Write(inDataB);
}


//use those variables here as well in some other functions
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I tried that, but receive the error "The name 'inDataA' does not exist in the current context" next to inDataA, within the DataReceivedHandlerA method. I believe it does not like the method being static, and the method fails if I make it non-static. –  baconcow Mar 30 at 5:29
    
Make them static like the one above in new updated version –  Hersh Mar 30 at 5:35
    
This stopped all errors during debugging. However, running the following in the Main() loop causes nothing to be written to the console: code Console.Write(inDataA); code –  baconcow Mar 30 at 5:49

When you call Console.Write(inDataxx) from main, the inDataxx is null or empty because the event handler has most likely not yet been triggered. Since you have not created a notification event or polling loop, this print command is executed once and only once.

In your main loop of the sample you provided there are three sections. The COM port setup, the console setup, and the COM tear down. This is all executed sequentially and there is not logic to continue to printing your public (now static variables). This example was designed to print directly from the event handlers. To get your design working, you will need to modify the main loop to poll or use events to print the data. Try some polling like this:

int keyIn = 0;
do
{
    // Check if any key pressed, read it into while-controlling variable
    if (Console.KeyAvailable)
        keyIn = Console.Read();
    // Poll our channel A data
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(inDataA))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Received data {0} on channel A", inDataA));
        inDataA = "";
    }
    // Poll our channel B data
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(inDataB))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Received data {0} on channel B", inDataB));
        inDataB = "";
    }
    // Stop looping when keyIn is no longer 0
}while (keyIn == 0);

Please note, that if you plan to use this is production code do not use polling. Polling is very inefficient.

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I have a much larger application that I am using this in. I want to be able to use the data in the inDataA in other portions of my application (calculations, etc.). Even though it is a stream, I have developed methods to buffer and parse it. Is there no efficient way to do this? I will try your method out. –  baconcow Mar 30 at 17:14
    
Is this all console base or is there a UI? If you are using the data elsewhere, consider building an object that describes this data. That can contain all of your methods and be readily available to any calculation with a valid reference to it. e.g. MyDataA.parse().DoMaths(); gist.github.com/corytodd/9876275#file-serial-polling –  cory.todd Mar 30 at 17:19
    
This will be a console (for now) as I have no capabilities in form programming. How would an class object be developed that could use the inDataA variable? Sorry that these may be basic questions, quite new with C#. –  baconcow Mar 30 at 17:28
    
Check out that updated gist to get an idea. There are many ways to approach this. Some people people take issue with excessive use of singletons but I don't really think it will be a big deal in this case. –  cory.todd Mar 30 at 17:52

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