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I am trying to find the difference between two arrays, by finding out which element was moved. I know that one element exactly will be moved and that the order will be maintained for the rest of the list, but am unable to figure out how to find this.

Example:

A: 1 2 3 4 5 6

B: 2 3 4 5 1 6

All of the elements exist in both lists, but how do I find out that the element 1 moved from index 0 to index 4?

My basic approach that I took but is not working is:

//Original array
var a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

//New array
var b = [2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 6];

for(var i=0; i < a.length; i++) {
    if(a[i] != b[i] && a[i+1] != b[i]) {
        console.log(b[i] + " moved");
    }
}

I have fixed by code to print out b[i] instead of a[i], but it is not working in all cases such as:

A: 1, 2, 3, 4

B: 1, 4, 2, 3

share|improve this question
    
define "not working". How does it fail? It looks good to me. – Jan Dvorak Mar 30 '14 at 6:21
    
@JanDvorak That code tells me that 5 moved, when the answer should be 1. – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:22
    
@Smash ... what are you trying to say? – Jan Dvorak Mar 30 '14 at 6:22
2  
@Flipper sounds like you should be printing b[i], then – Jan Dvorak Mar 30 '14 at 6:23
    
@JanDvorak Ah you are right! I just figured it out and was coming back to this page to answer my own question, but I can accept your answer if you write one? – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:24
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is with the second condition in your if statement. In your example, when element a[0] has moved, a[0+1] === b[0], so the if clause evaluates to false.

Try instead,

var idx = 0;
var len = a.length;
while ((a[idx] === b[idx] || a[idx] === b[idx+1]) && idx < len) {
    idx++;
}
console.log('Element a[' + idx + ']=' + a[idx] + ' moved.');
share|improve this answer
    
I find that it breaks on something like this: jsfiddle.net/76kTy As it should be that the element 4 has moved. – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:29
    
@Flipper why not post the example here? – Jan Dvorak Mar 30 '14 at 6:29
    
@Flipper consider [1,2,3,4] / [1,2,4,3]. What value should be printed? Also, your code doesn't work for elements moved backwards either. – Jan Dvorak Mar 30 '14 at 6:30
    
@JanDvorak I see the problem there in determining which one was moved. In my case I am comfortable with either one of those values (3 or 4). – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:33
    
I've updated my answer. It seems to work, in an updated version of your jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/munderwood/76kTy/2. Do you still find a case that it doesn't satisfy? – Michael Mar 30 '14 at 6:35

basically, if I understand correctly, an element moving means it is deleted and inserted somewhere else. so you first find the first point where there was a deletion/insertion:

function whichMoved(a, b) {
      for(var i=0; i < a.length; i++) {
        if (a[i] != b[i]) {

now, if it was a deletion, then the element has been moved forward, meaning, inserted in a greater index in b, and all elements between the indices are shifted to the left, meaning the the next element has moved one place to backward:

if(a[i+1] == b[i]) {
    console.log(a[i] + " moved forward");
    break;
}

otherwise, the element was moved backward:

else {
    console.log(b[i] + " moved backward")
    break;
}

the whole thing:

//Original array
var a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

//testing
whichMoved(a, [2,3,4,5,1,6]); //prints 1 moved forward
whichMoved(a, [5,1,2,3,4,6]); //prints 5 moved backward
function whichMoved(a, b) {
  for(var i=0; i < a.length; i++) {
    if (a[i] != b[i]) {
      if(a[i+1] == b[i]) {
        console.log(a[i] + " moved forward");
        break;
      } else {
        console.log(b[i] + " moved backward")
        break;
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is very good so I have upvoted it, but Michael's answer is very concise which is what I need. Thanks! – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:43

You can use jQuery .inArray() it will return the index, starting at 0 and returns -1 if not found:

var a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

//New array
var b = [2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 6];

for(i=0; i < a.length; i++) {
    var j = $.inArray(a[i], b);

    if(i != j){
        console.log(a[i], "moved to index "+j);
    }else{
        console.log(a[i], "not moved");
    } 
}

See this jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Rdzj4/

share|improve this answer
1  
That will print out all of the elements. And I don't see how inArray will help me since all of the elements exist in both arrays. – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:19
2  
Sorry I haven't not understood well at first. Yes you can use inArray since it returns the index you can compare it with i. See my updated answer. Thanks – Mark S Mar 30 '14 at 6:44
1  
I also same problem and in all answer here I see this very simple and very easy understand. Thank you – user3040235 Mar 30 '14 at 7:15

Edited- probably not needed, but I hate to leave a wrong answer.

Here I look at the distance each item is from its original index,

and figure the one that is most out of order is the mover-

This assumes in [2,1,3,4,5,6] it is the two that moved, not the 1,

and in [1,2, 3, 4, 6, 5] it is the 6, not the 5.

function whoMoved(a, b){
    var max= 0, min= a.length, dist, 
    order= b.map(function(itm, i){
        dist= i-a.indexOf(itm);
        if(dist<min) min= dist;
        if(dist>max) max= dist;
        return dist;
    });
    if(Math.abs(min)>= max) max= min;
    return b[order.indexOf(max)];
}

//test

var a= [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];

var b= [1, 6, 2, 3, 4, 5];//6 to left
var c= [1, 3, 4, 2, 5, 6];//2 to to right
var d= [3, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6];//3 to left
var e= [2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 6];//1 to right

[whoMoved(a, b), whoMoved(a, c), whoMoved(a, d),whoMoved(a, e)];

/*  returned value: (Array) [6,2,3,1] */
share|improve this answer
    
I have found that it breaks on my second example: jsfiddle.net/qKp3h – Flipper Mar 30 '14 at 6:36
    
this works when you move an element to the right, but not to the left – user2786485 Mar 30 '14 at 6:39

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