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I enter the following command line:

./file -a 1 -b2 -a5 -b 55 -b4

The output I get is:

a: 1
argv[1]: -a
b: 2
argv[2]: 1
a: 5
argv[3]: -b2
b: 55
argv[4]: -a5
b: 4
argv[5]: -b
Counter: 5

The output I wish to get should be:

a: 1
argv[1]: -a 1
b: 2
argv[2]: -b2
a: 5
argv[3]: -a5
b: 55
argv[4]: -b 55
b: 4
argv[5]: -b4
Counter: 5

Arguments with a space are currently counted as 2 arguments. I would like my program to count it as 1 argument only (I want it sees "-a 1". Not "-a" and "1" separately).

This is the source code I use I get the outputs:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <getopt.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{
    int opt = 0;
    int quantum1 = 0, quantum2 = 0;
    int counter = 0;

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv,"a:b:")) != -1) 
    {
        switch (opt) 
        {                           
             case 'a' : 
                quantum1 = atoi(optarg); 
                printf("a: %d\n", quantum1);
                break;

             case 'b' : 
                quantum2 = atoi(optarg);
                printf("b: %d\n", quantum2);
                break;

             default: 
                printf("Error\n");
                return 1;
                break;
        }
        counter++;
        printf("argv[%d]: %s\n", counter, argv[counter]);
    }

    printf("Counter: %d\n", counter);

    return 0;
}

Note: The quotation marks suggested work, but I'm not allowed to use quotation marks or any other symbols.

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2 Answers 2

Use

./file "-a 1" -b2 -a5 "-b 55" -b4

to make "-a 1" as the first argument and "-b 55" as the fourth argument.

If you are now allowed to use quotation marks, you can escape the space in linux using:

./file -a\ 1 -b2 -a5 -b\ 55 -b4
share|improve this answer
    
It works, but I'm not allowed to use the quotation marks. –  Lord Rixuel Mar 30 at 6:29
    
I'm not allowed to use the backslash neither or any other symbols. It has to be the option (-a) and an input(1) only. –  Lord Rixuel Mar 30 at 6:38
    
If you are not allowed to use a single quote, a double quote, or an escape character, I don't think there is anyway you can make your program get -a 1 as a single argument. –  R Sahu Mar 30 at 6:42
1  
It already does get -a 1 as a single argument. See my answer. –  user3386109 Mar 30 at 6:57
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The problem is not in the way the arguments are being parsed. The problem is the way the code displays the arguments. Specifically, when a space exists between the option and the argument, the optind will advance by two. optind is an external variable that getopt uses to keep track of the next index into the argv array.

So if you simply eliminate the counter and the lines shown below, you'll find that your code is already working correctly.

    counter++;
    printf("argv[%d]: %s\n", counter, argv[counter]);

printf("Counter: %d\n", counter);

If you absolutely must have a count of the number of arguments found, then simply update the counter in each case statement, e.g.

        case 'a' :
            counter++;
            ...

        case 'b' :
            counter++;
            ...

and then print the counter at the end. It's the printf("argv[%d]: %s\n", counter, argv[counter]); line that's getting you confused. That line serves no useful purpose and should be removed.


For a command line of ./test -a1 -b 2, the strings in argv will be

argv[0]: "./test"
argv[1]: "-a1"
argv[2]: "-b"
argv[3]: "2"

When you call getopt the first time, it will read argv[1] and will recognize the -a as one of the options that you've specified, so it splits the string into two parts and returns the 'a' while setting the optarg to "1".

When you call getopt the second time, it will read argv[2] and will recognize the -b option. Since you've specified that -b takes an argument, but argv[2] doesn't contain the argument, getopt will take argv[3] as the argument. Hence it returns the 'b' while setting the optarg to "2".

The bottom line is that getopt is designed to ignore the white space between the option and its argument. It does that by processing two of the argv strings if the user put white space between the option and its argument.

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I see. The counter counts "-a 1" and "-a1" as 1 argument, but the argv[counter] doesn't display "-a 1" and "-a1" as one. –  Lord Rixuel Mar 30 at 23:35
    
When I enter the cmd: ./test -a1 -b 2 The counter counts correctly the argc (there are 3 argc). When I try to display the argv[counter-1] (argv starts with case 0), it doesn't display "-b 2", but "-b" instead. –  Lord Rixuel Mar 30 at 23:58
    
@LordRixuel I've updated the answer to explain how getopt processes the strings in the argv array. –  user3386109 Mar 31 at 5:22
    
So is it not possible to include the white space between the option and its argument? –  Lord Rixuel Mar 31 at 21:15
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