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public class Fir extends Test 
{
    public static void main(String args[])  
    {
        Fir fir = new Fir();
        System.out.println(fir);
    }

    public String toString(String x) throws RuntimeException
    {
        return "Fir";
    }
}

class Test
{
    protected String toString(String x) throws NullPointerException
    {
        return "Test";
    }
}

Both classes do not override the toString method appropriately.

Question: Are these methods overriden?

If yes, what about this rule: If the superclass method declares an exception, subclass overridden method can declare same, subclass exception or no exception but cannot declare parent exception. RuntimeException is parent of NullPointerException.

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Have you tried compiling/running it? –  Christian Mar 30 '14 at 8:26
    
appropriately ... they to do override at all! –  Aniket Thakur Mar 30 '14 at 8:26
    
@Christian , of course I did. Output is Fir@5e8fce95 –  Ian McGrath Mar 30 '14 at 8:27
    
well, it is - see JB Nizet's answer –  Svetlin Zarev Mar 30 '14 at 8:31
1  
@IanMcGrath I misunderstood. I thought you were referring to override the toString() method from Object, not the one from Test. My apologies. –  Christian Mar 30 '14 at 8:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The rule you gave is correct, but it applies to checked exceptions, not to runtime exceptions. Any method is allowed to throw any runtime exception it wants, without declaring it. You may declare them, but it's purely for documentation purpose.

To answer your question, yes, the toString(String) method in Fir overrides the toString(String) method in Test. Add the @Override annotation to Fir.toString(), and the compiler will check that for you: you'll get a compilation error if Fir.toString(String) doesn't override any method.

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oops forgot about this rule. Thanks. –  Ian McGrath Mar 30 '14 at 8:29
    
JB makes a good point about the @Override annotation. You should always use it when overriding a method, to let the compiler help you catch mistakes. –  Jesper Mar 30 '14 at 8:53

Question: Are these methods overriden?

No. these methods are overloaded

the original method looks like this:

public String toString()
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1  
But the toString(String) method in Fir does override the toString(String) method in Test. So, overloaded with respect to Object.toString(), but overridden with respect to each other. –  Jesper Mar 30 '14 at 8:55

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