Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Today I wrote code for my project, and got unresolved external of linker, code must generate class with multiple virtual abstract methods - as base of class collections. So I decide use variadic templates for this task - but got error.

template<int I>
struct pin_tag {};

//inputs
template<int N, class T0, class... VAR>
class inputs_base : public inputs_base<N + 1, VAR...>
{
protected:
   typedef inputs_base<N + 1, VAR...> base_type;
   using arg_type = T0;
   //using base_type::_in;
   virtual void _in(T0 const& t, pin_tag<N>) = 0;
};

template<int N, class T0>
class inputs_base<N, T0>
{
protected:
   using arg_type = T0;
   virtual void _in(T0 const& t, pin_tag<N>) = 0;
};

template<class... VAR>
class inputs : public inputs_base<0, VAR...>
{
private:
   using inputs_type = inputs<VAR...>;
   using inputs_base_type = inputs_base<0, VAR...>;

   template <int N, class T = inputs_type>
   struct getter
   {
     using next_type = typename getter<N - 1, typename T::base_type>;
     using arg_type = typename next_type::arg_type;
     using current_type = typename next_type::current_type;
   };

   template <class T>
   struct getter<0, T>
   {
     using arg_type = typename T::arg_type;
     using current_type = typename T;
   };

   public:
   template<int N>
   using in_arg_type = typename getter<N>::arg_type;

   template<int N>
   void in(in_arg_type<N> const& t)
   {
     getter<N>::current_type::_in(t, pin_tag<N>());
   }
};


class test : public inputs< int, bool >
{
protected:
   virtual void _in(int const& val, pin_tag<0>)
   {}
   virtual void _in(bool const& val, pin_tag<1>)
   {}
 };

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

   test t;
   t.in<0>(100500);
}

I've got linker error

error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "protected: virtual void __thiscall inputs_base<0,int,bool>::_in(int const &,struct pin_tag<0>)" (?_in@?$inputs_base@$0A@H_N@@MAEXABHU?$pin_tag@$0A@@@@Z) referenced in function "public: void __thiscall inputs<int,bool>::in<0>(int const &)" (??$in@$0A@@?$inputs@H_N@@QAEXABH@Z)

It seems _in lost virtuality. Can anyone inspect my code please.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Solving the problem

In inputs<...>::in(), replace

getter<N>::current_type::_in(t, pin_tag<N>());

by

this->_in(t, pin_tag<N>());

Also, in inputs_base, restore line

using base_type::_in;

that is currently commented out.

See live example.

_in "lost virtuality" because you are explicitly calling it on base class getter<N>::current_type. Instead, this->_in(...) calls it as a virtual function.

But for this to work, you need all _in overloads in scope; using does this. Overwise, only the _in overload of the most derived base is visible. All others are hidden.

Cleaning up


You could simplify your code by using std::tuple_element instead of (or, to help you implement) your custom getter. Or at least remove getter from inputs and put it (or, a variant) in some more general "utilities" place; you'll definitely need it elsewhere.

Also,

using inputs_type = inputs<VAR...>;

is not needed. You can use inputs directly without appending <VAR...>. This is done automatically by the compiler for your convenience within the scope of inputs definition.

Here is your cleaned-up code in action. The implementation of inputs_base and inputs drops from 51 to 21 lines of code.

Now inputs_base is doing only one job: declare multiple overloads of _in(). Also, defining in() as a template function, neither getter nor std::tuple_element is needed. In particular, inputs is simplified merely down to

template<class... U>
struct inputs : inputs_base<0, U...>
{
    template<int N, typename T>
    void in(T const& t) { this->_in(t, pin_tag<N>()); }
};

Generalizing


Your code assumes each virtual function _in overload is void and takes a single input argument, that is a reference to const. This can be a limitation. Generalizing this approach to handle a set of arbitrary function signatures would make this code extremely useful.

Here is the generalized code in action. It's not much longer. Now test is modified as follows:

struct test : overload<void(int), void(bool)>
// ...

that is, it is parametrized in terms of entire function signatures rather than single-argument types. Call by value is just fine for int or bool; no need for const&.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.