Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have binary file

BinaryWriter binwriter = new BinaryWriter(File.Open("C:\\temp\\Users.bin", FileMode.Create));
binwriter.Write(buff);
binwriter.Close();

It works, but how can I read data from this file? I need to read new line each time, while it is not end of file.

BinaryReader binreader = new BinaryReader(File.Open("C:\\temp\\Users.bin", FileMode.Open));
byte[] m = binreader.ReadBytes(??????); //I to read only 1 line to m, and then I need to read again new line to m. 
share|improve this question
3  
If it's a binary file then there's no concept of a "line". That's specific to text. Please give more information. – Jon Skeet Mar 30 '14 at 13:51
    
I write to FILE arrays like m, and I want to read them, by line I mean 1 array m – user3102962 Mar 30 '14 at 14:48
    
No, that's not clear at all. What do you mean by a "file array"? And what do you mean by a "line" if this is arbitrary binary data? For example, imagine that the file actually contains a piece of music encoded as MP3 - what does a "line" mean in that context? It's vital that you understand the nature of your data and treat it accordingly. – Jon Skeet Mar 30 '14 at 14:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Binary file doesn't have the concept of a "line", however you can try to read it like a text file by doing this way :

  using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(filePath))
  {
    string line;
    while ((line = streamReader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
      Console.WriteLine(line);
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path)) 
            {
                while (sr.Peek() >= 0) 
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(sr.ReadLine());
                }
            }

you can of course adapt it to your needs instead of printing it on the Console.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why use Peek? It's cleaner (IMO) just to read a line at a time until ReadLine returns null. However, all of this is assuming a text file, whereas the question appears to be confused about whether the data is text or binary. – Jon Skeet Mar 30 '14 at 13:52
    
Yea it's indeed confusing, but since he was asking about reading a single line, I thought he was gonna codify his byte stream in such a way. I suggested to use Peek because it was suggested on MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/it-it/library/…. – Saverio Terracciano Mar 30 '14 at 13:55
    
Ick - MSDN fail again, IMO :( – Jon Skeet Mar 30 '14 at 13:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.