Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My colleague has been using "new function()" with a lower case "f" to define new objects in JavaScript. It seems to work well in all major browsers and it also seems to be fairly effective at hiding private variables. Here's an example:

    var someObj = new function () {
        var inner = 'some value';
        this.foo = 'blah';

        this.get_inner = function () {
            return inner;
        };

        this.set_inner = function (s) {
            inner = s;
        };
    };

As soon as "this" is used, it becomes a public property of someObj. So someObj.foo, someObj.get_inner() and someObj.set_inner() are all available publicly. In addition, set_inner() and get_inner() are privileged methods, so they have access to "inner" through closures.

However, I haven't seen any reference to this technique anywhere. Even Douglas Crockford's JSLint complains about it:

  • weird construction. Delete 'new'

We're using this technique in production and it seems to be working well, but I'm a bit anxious about it because it's not documented anywhere. Does anyone know if this is a valid technique?

share|improve this question
3  
I prefer your construct over the IIFE ('Immediately-Invoked Function'). 1: You don't need an explicit 'instance' object, that's exactly what 'this' is in JavaScript. 2: You don't need to return anything, which means, you don't need to remember to. Even the author of the accepted answer forgot to return the instance object initially! People usually prefer to use an IIFE if they hate new & this, with good reason - If you have a function handling a DOM event, this will refer to the element that fired the event, not your object, but you could just have var instance = this instead. –  Lee Kowalkowski Jul 3 '12 at 12:56
1  
Why is it important to the question to specify "lower case f" ? –  ClearCloud8 Apr 3 '13 at 19:56
4  
Because in Javascript there also exists the 'Function' function (with uppercase F), which is different: Function is a constructor function that can create new function objects, whereas function is a keyword. –  Stijn de Witt Jul 27 '13 at 1:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 42 down vote accepted

I've seen that technique before, it's valid, you are using a function expression as if it were a Constructor Function.

But IMHO, you can achieve the same with an auto-invoking function expression, I don't really see the point of using the new operator in that way:

var someObj = (function () {
    var instance = {},
        inner = 'some value';

    instance.foo = 'blah';

    instance.get_inner = function () {
        return inner;
    };

    instance.set_inner = function (s) {
        inner = s;
    };

    return instance;
})();

The purpose of the new operator is to create new object instances, setting up the [[Prototype]] internal property, you can see how this is made by the [Construct] internal property.

The above code will produce an equivalent result.

share|improve this answer
1  
The ECMAScript 262 Specification in Section 13 explains this a little more formally. Something like function foo () {} returns the result of creating a Function object [presumably with new Function ()]. It's syntax sugar. –  clintp Feb 16 '10 at 17:16
3  
I think you are missing a return instance; at the end. Otherwise, someObj will just be undefined. :-) –  Matthew Crumley Feb 16 '10 at 17:27
    
@Matthew: Yes, I missed the return statement, thanks. –  CMS Feb 16 '10 at 17:54
1  
May I suggest that if you care about modularity and information hiding, that you just give up on this and start using something like require.js? You're halfway there, why stop here? Asynchronous Module Definition (which is what require.js implements) supports this usecase and gives you a whole toolset to deal with scoping, namespacing and dependency management. –  Stijn de Witt Jul 27 '13 at 1:48
    
Note that the parentheses surrounding the function declaration are unnecessary since the statement is already an expression due to the presence of = –  Explosion Pills Aug 15 '13 at 18:39

Your code is just similar to the less weird construct

function Foo () {
    var inner = 'some value';
    this.foo = 'blah';

    ...
};
var someObj = new Foo;
share|improve this answer
7  
It is not just similar, it does exactly the same thing... with the sole exception that they will not be able to reuse Foo for creating another object. –  kikito Feb 16 '10 at 17:41
1  
The OP's version could be reused via new someObj.constructor. Here the constructor is added to the namespace explicitly; the right style depends on the intended purpose of the function. Also, this style - though certainly the standard - lets someone populate the global namespace if they forget new before Foo. –  J Bryan Price Dec 28 '12 at 20:48

To clarify some aspects and make Douglas Crockford's JSLint not to complain about your code here are some examples of instantiation:

1. o = new Object(); // normal call of a constructor

2. o = new Object;   // accepted call of a constructor

3. var someObj = new (function () {  
    var inner = 'some value';
    this.foo = 'blah';

    this.get_inner = function () {
        return inner;
    };

    this.set_inner = function (s) {
        inner = s;
    };
})(); // normal call of a constructor

4. var someObj = new (function () {  
    var inner = 'some value';
    this.foo = 'blah';

    this.get_inner = function () {
        return inner;
    };

    this.set_inner = function (s) {
        inner = s;
    };
}); // accepted call of a constructor

In example 3. expression in (...) as value is a function/constructor. It looks like this: new (function (){...})(). So if we omit ending brackets as in example 2, the expression is still a valid constructor call and looks like example 4.

Douglas Crockford's JSLint "thinks" you wanted to assign the function to someObj, not its instance. And after all it's just an warning, not an error.

share|improve this answer

Like Crockford says, it's weird. See CMS's answer. But, to answer explicitly, what you are doing is fine, just weird. Please read the ECMAScript spec. The latest version is here: http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-262.pdf Yes, it's hard work, but it's worth the effort. It might be heavy going but it's not meant to be read cover-to-cover. Just pick out the bits you need and follow any cross-references. Each time you look at it it will become easier to understand.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.