Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Based on below examples of defining functions what is the best use of 2 and 3 in different scenarios?

  1. def sum(x: Int, y: Int): Int = { x+y } This is a function definition with arguments, return type and function body

  2. val sum = (x: Int, y: Int) => { x+y } This seems like an assignment of lambda function to a variable, why return type is never defined here?

  3. val sum: (Int, Int) => Int = (x,y) => { x+y } This is defining a function as a type? I don't understand how this works!

All 3 functions when invoked will yield the same result:

scala> sum(1,2) Int = 3

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. def sum(x: Int, y: Int): Int = { x+y } This is a function definition with arguments, return type and function body

This is not a function definition. This is a method definition. Functions and methods are fundamentally different. Functions are objects, methods are not. (Methods belong to objects.) Methods can be polymorphic, functions can't.

  1. val sum = (x: Int, y: Int) => { x+y } This seems like an assignment of lambda function to a variable, why return type is never defined here?

Are you asking why the type of sum isn't declared or why the return type of the function literal isn't declared? The return type of the function literal isn't declared because there is no way in the syntax to do so. You simply cannot declare the return type of a function literal, it is always inferred. The type of sum isn't declared because it is not necessary: it can be inferred to be the same as the type of the function literal, i.e. Function2[Int, Int, Int].

Think val foo = "Hello".

  1. val sum: (Int, Int) => Int = (x,y) => { x+y } This is defining a function as a type?

No. This is the exact same thing as 2., except that here the type of sum is explicitly declared (as (Int, Int) => Int which is syntactic sugar for Function[Int, Int, Int]) instead of inferred. Since the type of sum is known, you can leave off the types of the function parameters, because they can be inferred from the context.

Think val foo: String = "Hello".

share|improve this answer
    
Wait I'm confused... you're saying in (2) syntax doesn't allow for setting function type explicitly but in (3) you're saying it is the same as (2) but function type is set explicitly :) which means syntax allows for it. –  marcin_koss Mar 30 '14 at 19:36
    
According to the cheatsheet on scala-lang.org (1) is a function definition docs.scala-lang.org/cheatsheets –  marcin_koss Mar 30 '14 at 19:40
1  
@marcin_koss: Sorry, that should have said "return type". You cannot declare the return type of a function literal, it is always inferred. If you don't use the function literal syntax, i.e. you explicitly create an anonymous subclass of Function2 and manually implement the apply method, then it's a different story. In (3), you do not declare the return type of the function literal, you declare the type of the variable that the function literal is being assigned to be a function type with specific return type. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 30 '14 at 19:41
1  
We are talking about Scala here. In Scala, the terms "function" and "method" have precise meanings that are defined with mathematical rigor in the Scala Language Specification. It is unfortunate, that even within the very same document that defines them as clearly separate entities, they are mixed up. It is always in a context where there is no confusion, but still … using a term such as "subroutine" that doesn't have any specific meaning in Scala would be much better IMO. And in the link you quoted, it is clearly wrong. def defines a method, function literals define functions. –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 30 '14 at 19:57
1  
@marcin_koss, indeed it has. In Scala a function is just an instance of a class which extends certain trait (one from a family of classes FunctionX). Functions can be passed around and stored into variables. If you have C++ background, you can probably think of functions in Scala as functors in C++. Methods, on the other hand, are usual object-oriented methods, just as you defined them. In fact, on the low level functions are implemented in terms of methods (function is an object with a method called apply). –  Vladimir Matveev Mar 30 '14 at 20:01

In line 2, scala compiler inferences type of lambda function.

val sum = (x: Int, y: Int) => { x + y }
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          function value

x and y are type of Int, thus x + y is a Int type. In this case, type of sum is (Int, Int) => Int.

In line 3, it shows the type of sum - (Int, Int) => Int. sum indicates a function same with line 2.

val sum: (Int, Int) => Int = (x,y) => { x+y }
         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
         type                function value

Right side of = is function signature and body. It receives two arguments called x and y. Its body is x + y.

Shortly, line 2 and line 3 are equivalent. Line 2 has no type of function value, but scala can inference its type. Line 3 has type of function value explicitly, and omits argument type of signature of function value.

share|improve this answer

this is about the difference between method and function. The useful link to show the difference is http://java.dzone.com/articles/revealing-scala-magician%E2%80%99s

I think in the 3rd way, you can understand it like a type T = (Int, Int) => Int and then do this : val sum: T = (x,y) => { x+y }

another thing is that if remove input arguments, method and function is different.

def sum: Int = { 3 } //call sum, get 3

val sum: () => Int = () => { 3 } //call sum, return a function, need to call sum() to get 3

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.