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I'm parsing a modified XML from http://hackage.haskell.org/package/xml-conduit-1.1.0.9/docs/Text-XML-Stream-Parse.html

Here's what it looks like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<population xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://example.com">
  <success>true</success>
  <row_count>2</row_count>
  <summary>
    <bananas>0</bananas>
  </summary>
  <people>
      <person>
          <firstname>Michael</firstname>
          <age>25</age>
      </person>
      <person>
          <firstname>Eliezer</firstname>
          <age>2</age>
      </person>
  </people>
</population>

How do I get a list of firstname and age for every person?

My goal is to use http-conduit to download this xml and then parse it, but I am looking for a solution on how to parse when there are no attributes (use tagNoAttrs?)

Here's what I've tried, and I've added my questions in the Haskell comments:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
import Control.Monad.Trans.Resource
import Data.Conduit (($$))
import Data.Text (Text, unpack)
import Text.XML.Stream.Parse
import Control.Applicative ((<*))

data Person = Person Int Text
        deriving Show

-- Do I need to change the lambda function \age to something else to get both name and age?
parsePerson = tagNoAttr "person" $ \age -> do
        name <- content  -- How do I get age from the content?  "unpack" is for attributes
        return $ Person age name

parsePeople = tagNoAttr "people" $ many parsePerson

-- This doesn't ignore the xmlns attributes
parsePopulation  = tagName "population" (optionalAttr "xmlns" <* ignoreAttrs) $ parsePeople

main = do
        people <- runResourceT $
             parseFile def "people2.xml" $$ parsePopulation
        print people
share|improve this question
1  
What have you tried so far? – bheklilr Mar 30 '14 at 19:51
1  
Edited to add what I've tried so far and comments – Lionel Mar 30 '14 at 22:05
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Firstly: parsing combinators in xml-conduit haven't been updated in quite a while, and show their age. I recommend most people to use the DOM or cursor interface instead. That said, let's look at your example. There are two problems with your code:

  • It doesn't properly handle XML namespaces. All of the element names are in the http://example.com namespace, and your code needs to reflect that.
  • The parsing combinators demand that you account for all elements. They won't automatically skip over some elements for you.

So here's an implementation using the streaming API that gets the desired result:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
import           Control.Monad.Trans.Resource (runResourceT)
import           Data.Conduit                 (Consumer, ($$))
import           Data.Text                    (Text)
import           Data.Text.Read               (decimal)
import           Data.XML.Types               (Event)
import           Text.XML.Stream.Parse

data Person = Person Int Text
        deriving Show

-- Do I need to change the lambda function \age to something else to get both name and age?
parsePerson :: MonadThrow m => Consumer Event m (Maybe Person)
parsePerson = tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}person" $ do
        name <- force "firstname tag missing" $ tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}firstname" content
        ageText <- force "age tag missing" $ tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}age" content
        case decimal ageText of
            Right (age, "") -> return $ Person age name
            _ -> force "invalid age value" $ return Nothing

parsePeople :: MonadThrow m => Consumer Event m [Person]
parsePeople = force "no people tag" $ do
    _ <- tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}success" content
    _ <- tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}row_count" content
    _ <- tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}summary" $
        tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}bananas" content
    tagNoAttr "{http://example.com}people" $ many parsePerson

-- This doesn't ignore the xmlns attributes
parsePopulation :: MonadThrow m => Consumer Event m [Person]
parsePopulation = force "population tag missing" $
    tagName "{http://example.com}population" ignoreAttrs $ \() -> parsePeople

main :: IO ()
main = do
        people <- runResourceT $
             parseFile def "people2.xml" $$ parsePopulation
        print people

Here's an example using the cursor API. Note that it has different error handling characteristics, but should produce the same result for well-formed input.

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
import Text.XML
import Text.XML.Cursor
import Data.Text (Text)
import Data.Text.Read (decimal)
import Data.Monoid (mconcat)

main :: IO ()
main = do
    doc <- Text.XML.readFile def "people2.xml"
    let cursor = fromDocument doc
    print $ cursor $// element "{http://example.com}person" >=> parsePerson

data Person = Person Int Text
        deriving Show

parsePerson :: Cursor -> [Person]
parsePerson c = do
    let name = c $/ element "{http://example.com}firstname" &/ content
        ageText = c $/ element "{http://example.com}age" &/ content
    case decimal $ mconcat ageText of
        Right (age, "") -> [Person age $ mconcat name]
        _ -> []
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the two methods of doing this! The cursor API looks much simpler. If I'm using http-conduit to do a POST (it's how I'm getting the xml), do I need to continue using xml-conduit or can I use the cursor API? I am using httpLbs (lazy byte string) in http-conduit – Lionel Apr 1 '14 at 7:03
    
Well, you'll still be using xml-conduit, since the cursor API is part of it. The most efficient way you could do this would be to use sinkDoc together with the http function. Though you can go the simpler route and just use httpLbs if you'd prefer. – Michael Snoyman Apr 1 '14 at 9:56
    
Does the cursor API still avoid keeping the whole XML structure in memory at once? Nevermind, seems like it does: stackoverflow.com/questions/29454267/… – unhammer Jan 23 at 12:48

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