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What I'm doing is looking up a value for a particular field in the hashtable. The object can be a handful of primitive types who's value is destined to be put inside XML but it comes out of the hashtable as an object. So I have the problem of needing to decide what the type is, cast it up and then use that types ToString. It would be nice if I didn't need to cast it but then it will call the ToString on the object type and not the counterpart method on the actual type.

The following code is functionally correct, but I'm not comfortable with it. Perhaps following this comfort path will lead to me being a purist. Either way I would very much appreciate a nicer way to write this if such exists.

public string GetColumnValue(string columnName)
        {
            object value = item[columnName];

            if (value == null)
                return string.Empty;

            if (value.GetType() == typeof(string))
            {
                return (string)value;
            }
            else if (value.GetType() == typeof(double))
            {
                return ((double)value).ToString();
            }
            ...
        }
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If all you are doing is calling ToString, due to the polymorphic nature of C#, the ToString will call the correct implementation, even if all you have is a reference to Object.

E.g.:

var d=DateTime.Now;
object od=d;
Console.WriteLine(od.ToString());
Console.WriteLine(d.ToString());   //same as previous line
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1  
This works for the basic types, but may not work well for custom types - depends on what can be returned in item[columnName]... –  Reed Copsey Feb 16 '10 at 17:24
    
Reed, can you give an example? –  spender Feb 16 '10 at 17:26
    
I honestly didn't think this would work. So for arguments sake, how can you explicitly call a ToString implementation on a particular type of an inheritance tree? –  Dan Revell Feb 16 '10 at 17:27
1  
@Reed : Clearly the best way to handle this in 3.5+ is with helper functions. Make a helper for each type you want to handle that does not have a ToString() you like. –  Hogan Feb 16 '10 at 17:38
1  
@Hogan - Unless Circle decorates its ToString() method with new rather than override, then the expression type has no influence at all on which method gets called. Only the runtime type of the object matters. ((Shape)aCircleVar).ToString() is exactly the same as aCircleVar.ToString(). –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Feb 16 '10 at 18:11

Depending on your list of acceptable types, you may want to consider using Convert.ToString and/or the IConvertable interface.

This will allow you to handle most of the primitive types in one shot.

You will still need to handle your null check, however.

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edit

Test codes are here if anyone is interested: http://gist.github.com/raw/305787/dc5349d9f6fa37ee5d621b43ec92dade60fe1c8d/ToStringTests.cs

Below you will find my original answer. Someone pointed out that you might have a type which does not have a ToString() you like (because it uses Object or something higher up in the chain). The best way to handle this in 3.0+ is with a extension method like this:

    public static class ToStringExpander
    {
       public static string MyToString (this Object x)
       {
          return x.ToString();
       }

       public static string MyToString (this mytype x)
       {
          return "This is the to string of mytype!";
       }
    }

Now mytype will work with the GetColumnValue below if you change ToString() to MyToString()

original post

This will do what you want.

   public string GetColumnValue(string columnName)
    {
        object value = item[columnName];

        if (value == null)
            return string.Empty;

        return object.ToString();
    }

or if you want to look old school:

   public string GetColumnValue(string columnName)
    {
        return (item[columnName] == null ? string.Empty : item[columnName].ToString());
    }

of course true old school would be to make a #define macro...

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1  
The method name resolution rules require that an object's member methods are selected in preference to any extension methods that might be in scope. So I'm pretty sure that what you are suggesting here will not work. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Feb 16 '10 at 18:19
    
Yeah, I just tested it, the book I was reading implied it would act like I described, I changed the answer to a new solution. –  Hogan Feb 16 '10 at 18:38

Why can't you just use .ToString() on value since .ToString() is inherited from object? The .ToString() for the appropriate type further up the inheritance chain will be called.

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Still needs the null check, though. –  Reed Copsey Feb 16 '10 at 17:24

ToString() is a virtual method. This means that any calls to that method will, at runtime, select the correct implementation (the "most derived type"). Since all the primative types override ToString() to do the correct thing, there is no reason for any casting to any type of variable.

For a virtual method, the type of the variable does not matter in selecting the correct implementation. All that matters is runtime type of the object being referenced.

int x = 10;
object o = x;
x.ToString();
o.ToString();

Both calls to ToString() will execute the same code (minus the unboxing that occurs in the object version, since int is a value type).

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