Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So I've set this up as a test for KeyEvents and timers. The first time the right arrow key is pressed the event will wait 5 seconds like the timer is setup to, then print KeyPressed. However, after the first println, KeyPressed will be printed in rapid succession like a long queue of KeyEvents it was collecting up while I held the key down.I don't want all the extra key presses that holding the right arrow key causes. I want to hold the right arrow key down and only receive a println every 5 seconds. Any help is greatly appreciated.

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.awt.event.KeyAdapter;
import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;

public class GameBoard extends JPanel
{

public Ninja ninja;


public GameBoard()
{
    addKeyListener(new TAdapter());
    setFocusable(true);
    setBackground(Color.BLACK);
    setDoubleBuffered(true); 
    ninja = new Ninja();
}

public void paint(Graphics g)
{
    Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;

    g2.drawImage(ninja.getImage(), 20,20,null);
}

private class TAdapter extends KeyAdapter
{

    private Timer timer;


    @Override
    public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e)
    {
        timer = new Timer(5000, new ActionListener(){

            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae)
            {
                System.out.println("KeyPressed");

            }

        });

        timer.start();

    }


    @Override
    public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e)
    {

        ninja.keyReleased(e);
        repaint();
    }

}
}
share|improve this question
    
You will want to use Key Bindings, not a KeyListener, and will want to bind to the KeyStroke that has a boolean parameter, released, on the end. Please see my answer here for more on this and for a working code example. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Mar 30 '14 at 20:13
    
I just wanted to say thanks for all the answers and replies. I do appreciate all input as every little bit broadens my perspective on programming in general. –  Cory Smith Mar 30 '14 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When the key is held down, the OS will generate a repeating event for the stroke.

Normally, you would need some kind of flag that would indicate that the keyPressed event has already been handled or not.

Based on your example, you could use the Timer. For example, when keyPressed is triggered, you would check to see of the Timer is null or is running...

if (timer == null || !timer.isRunning()) {...

Now, in your keyReleased event, you could need to stop the timer, so that the next time keyPressed is triggered, you can restart the timer.

This assumes that you only want the timer to run only while the key is pressed.

As a general suggestion, you should be using Key Bindings instead of KeyListener as it will provide you better control over the focus level which triggers the key events

Updated with Key Bindings Example

This is based on what your code appears to be doing...

Walkies

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.AbstractAction;
import javax.swing.ActionMap;
import javax.swing.InputMap;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.KeyStroke;
import javax.swing.Timer;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class WalkCycle {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new WalkCycle();
    }

    public WalkCycle() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private List<BufferedImage> walkCycle;

        private int frame;

        private Timer timer;

        public TestPane() {
            setBackground(Color.WHITE);
            walkCycle = new ArrayList<>(10);
            try {
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk01.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk02.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk03.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk04.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk05.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk06.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk07.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk08.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk09.png")));
                walkCycle.add(ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/Walk10.png")));

                Timer timer = new Timer(80, new ActionListener() {
                    @Override
                    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                        frame++;
                        if (frame >= walkCycle.size()) {
                            frame = 0;
                        }
                        System.out.println(frame);
                        repaint();
                    }
                });

                InputMap im = getInputMap(WHEN_IN_FOCUSED_WINDOW);
                ActionMap am = getActionMap();
                im.put(KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(KeyEvent.VK_RIGHT, 0, false), "right-down");
                im.put(KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(KeyEvent.VK_RIGHT, 0, true), "right-up");

                am.put("right-down", new TimerAction(timer, true));
                am.put("right-up", new TimerAction(timer, false));
            } catch (IOException exp) {
                exp.printStackTrace();
            }
        }


        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return new Dimension(300, 300);
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            Graphics g2d = (Graphics2D) g.create();
            BufferedImage img = walkCycle.get(frame);
            int x = (getWidth() - img.getWidth()) / 2;
            int y = (getHeight() - img.getHeight()) / 2;
            g2d.drawImage(img, x, y, this);
            g2d.dispose();
        }

    }

    public class TimerAction extends AbstractAction {

        private Timer timer;
        private boolean start;

        public TimerAction(Timer timer, boolean start) {
            this.timer = timer;
            this.start = start;
        }

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            if (start && !timer.isRunning()) {
                System.out.println("Start");
                timer.start();
            } else if (!start && timer.isRunning()) {
                System.out.println("stop");
                timer.stop();
            }
        }

    }

}

Personally, I would have a single Timer which was always ticking, which updated the view. The view would then check with the model about what should be updated and rendered and the key bindings would update the state of the model, but that's just me.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks like what I want is simply not going to be possible with Key Listeners and as such I will need to start working with Key Bindings. I've tried it every possible way I could think of, with outer and inner timers. Nothing will work for animating a character with a stack of images while holding a arrow key. No matter what I do the 20 key events from holding the key down eventually break through and mess up the animation. –  Cory Smith Mar 30 '14 at 21:37
    
I'll see if I can put together an example later –  MadProgrammer Mar 30 '14 at 21:40

When you hold down a key, keyPressed events will happen in rapid succession. What you have done is added a 5 second delay to this wave of events.

To fix this depends on what you want to do. If you want to only allow an event to happen every 5 seconds, you can move the timer outside of the event, then when the event gets called, check if 5 seconds has passed based on a boolean toggled by the timer every 5 seconds.

share|improve this answer
    
Well see what I'm trying to do is create an animation by firing 3 images in succession when the right arrow key is pressed. To do this I need a timer in between the image repaint(), but when I hold the key down, the timer becomes non existent and the image turns into a blur of extremely fast moving images. –  Cory Smith Mar 30 '14 at 20:12

This will solve your problem.

No timer is required

Its a simple use to system current timing...

private long startTime;

private class TAdapter extends KeyAdapter {
    public void keyPressed(final KeyEvent e) {

        if (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime > 2000) {
            startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
            ninja.keyPressed(e, 1);
            repaint();
        } else if (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime > 1000) {
            ninja.keyPressed(e, 2);
            repaint();
        }
    }

    public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {
        ninja.keyReleased(e);
        repaint();

        startTime = 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You do realize that they delay between the first keyPressed and the second (and repeated key events) is different and os specific... –  MadProgrammer Mar 30 '14 at 20:18
    
Sorry, I didn't get it. Please can you explain it in detail. –  Braj Mar 30 '14 at 20:20
    
The time between the first keyPressed event and the second is longer then the second and subsequent keyPressed events, therefore, is uneven. The time between key events is also OS specific. –  MadProgrammer Mar 30 '14 at 20:24
    
Thanks I got it now. But the problem is with the right key holding for a long time and displaying two images on the rotation basic with some interval. Its the time between the repaint(), nothing related to key events. That's why it will work fine on any OS. –  Braj Mar 30 '14 at 20:29
    
It could cause an uneven update between the Intial key strokes. Base on your example, the OP would also need a very large sequence of if-else statements –  MadProgrammer Mar 30 '14 at 20:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.