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What are the merits and demerits of the following two code snippets:

return n==0 ? 0 : n==1 ? 1 : fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);

and

 if(n==0)  
    return 0;
 if(n==1)
    return 1;
 return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);

for calculating the nth letter in the Fibonacci sequence?

Which one would you favour and why?

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7  
community wiki? –  falstro Feb 16 '10 at 17:39
6  
I prefer return round(pow(GOLDEN_RATIO,n) / sqrt(5)); –  KennyTM Feb 16 '10 at 17:39
1  
The nth letter? Is this the Roman version of the Fibonacci sequence? –  Mark Byers Feb 16 '10 at 17:40
2  
The second one, first of all because the first one is wrong (fib(n-1) + fib(n+1)?) and second because there's no point in doing that, it just makes the code unreadable. –  IVlad Feb 16 '10 at 17:41
1  
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closed as not constructive by falstro, Jørn Schou-Rode, Earlz, 0xA3, YOU Feb 17 '10 at 1:55

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14 Answers

The first one is the devil and must be purged with fire.

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1  
And the second is little better. –  Clifford Feb 16 '10 at 17:41
    
What is wrong with first one ? –  Hannoun Yassir Feb 16 '10 at 17:49
    
@Yassir - it doesn't calculate a fibonacci number –  mocj Feb 16 '10 at 17:56
    
@mocj - Edited, thanks. Sorry for the silly mistake –  Tom Feb 16 '10 at 18:10
2  
@tom - that's exactly the point, isn't it? It won't be your first mistake when you write your code like that. –  Hans Passant Feb 16 '10 at 18:26
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I would favour:

return n <= 1 ? n : fib(n-1)+fib(n-2);
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1  
n would have to be unsigned, since fib(-1) is undefined –  Tom Feb 16 '10 at 17:42
1  
Indeed; neither of the Tom's suggestions have much merit. –  Clifford Feb 16 '10 at 17:43
    
Tom: Sure. But yours are even worse. They wouldn't terminate until they've made an overflow on IntXX.MinValue and back to 0. Might even Stack Overflow before then... –  Sani Huttunen Feb 16 '10 at 18:09
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I would prefer writing:

if (n == 0) {
    return 0;
}
else if (n == 1) {
    return 1;
}
else {
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

This is very readable code. I don't even like omitting braces as the code is not that readable and when you maintain code that omits braces, you easily make bugs.

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1  
I agree, in my opinion, brackets should never ever be omitted. –  dassouki Feb 16 '10 at 18:07
    
I agree, don't omit braces. (Although I prefer the opening brace on a separate line) –  Liz Albin Feb 16 '10 at 18:53
    
I disagree, please omit braces. Adding braces on one-line if statements is equivalent to adding semicolons to the end of every line in Python. –  Cory Petosky Feb 16 '10 at 19:05
    
This is just an matter of opinion. The only exception that I allow myself to do is that I can test is parameters are valid like this: int foo(int bar) { if (bar < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException(); } It requires that the if statement really is on-line statement and does not have new line before the throw statement. One of my favorite quotes is from Kent Beck: "I'm not a great programmer, I'm a pretty good programmer with great habits." I have seen programmers to fail to implement working code/fixing bugs because of this just too many times. –  Lauri Feb 17 '10 at 8:09
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Everything in life is a matter of equilibrium. Finding the right compromise between two opposite ends of the spectrum. Optimality is a scoring function that is highly dependent on the evaluator, and the situation, but you should strive for the sweet spot in everything.

Programming is not different. you should evaluate

  • simplicity
  • terseness
  • efficiency
  • practicality
  • artistic freedom of expression
  • time constraints

and find the sweet spot.

Your first construct is clearly powerful and geeky, but definitely not easy to understand.

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I prefer the second over the first, mostly for readability.

The second "reads" well - it has the code broken up, so it reads most like English. This will make it easier to understand for many developers.

Personally, I find multiple, chained ternary operations difficult to follow at times.

Also, I personally find "conciseness" to be a poor goal, in most cases. Modern IDEs make "longer" code much more manageable than it used to be. I'm not saying you want to be overly verbose, but trying to be concise often causes an increase in the maintenance effort, in my experience.

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If you're asking for readability, I'd prefer the second option because it doesn't contain the (double!) ternary operator. Usually you're writing code that other people also have to read, and from the second snippet, it's clear at first sight what the function does. In the first snippet though, one has to resolve both ternary operators "in your head" and additionally think about associativity (I'd think about that automatically because parentheses are missing).

But anyway, you could reduce the two if statements to one:

if(n <= 1) return n;
return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
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I'd prefer neither because they are both too slow. Readability should not come at the cost of an exponential explosion in runtime, especially when there exists a simple way that runs in linear time.

I'd do this something like this (pseudo-code):

a = 0;
b = 1;
n.times { a, b = b, a + b; }

In C you'd have to use a temporary variable unfortunately, but the principle is the same.

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1  
Wow, how delightfully on topic, yet completely off topic. –  Earlz Feb 16 '10 at 17:43
    
Earlz: Hypocrite? stackoverflow.com/questions/2274937/… –  Mark Byers Feb 16 '10 at 17:59
    
umm? I don't get it. –  Earlz Feb 16 '10 at 18:12
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Of the two, the second is easier to understand at a glance. However, I'd consolidate it as

if (n <= 1) 
  return n;
else
  return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);

Or, if you're not into multiple returns:

if (n > 1)
  n = fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
return n;
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I often find that indentation can make the multiple-ternary operators a lot more readable:

return n == 0 ? 0 :
       n == 1 ? 1 :
                fib(n-1) + fib(n-2); 
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I prefer the second one in most situations, but there are times where it seems a bit of a waste to not do it in one line. For instance, I'd prefer

text="my stuff_"+id==null ? "default" : id;

to

text="my stuff_";
if(id==null){
  text+="default";
}else{
  text+=id;
}

Note, this also helps with DRY because now if you need to change the name of text then you only change it in one place, compared to 3.

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if you use the ?: operator two or three times you will get used to it so i would go with the first

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I'd say even more than @Lauri:

if (n == 0) {
    tmp = 0;
}
else if (n == 1) {
    tmp = 1;
}
else {
    tmp = fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}
return tmp;

It's good to have just one exit point.

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So you'd prefer to use a temporary variable than having 3 points of return all at the end of a function and all in one place? –  Earlz Feb 16 '10 at 17:58
    
What's the problem with that? The compiler should be able to optimise that without problems and it helps to write maintainable and debuggable code. –  fortran Feb 16 '10 at 18:37
    
Introducing a temporary variable strictly for the purpose of restricting yourself to having only one exit point is the opposite of "maintainable" coding. –  mocj Feb 16 '10 at 20:16
    
yeah, I bet you're a lot smarter than Dijkstra was... –  fortran Feb 16 '10 at 20:23
    
When did I make such a claim? You can't seriously claim this version is somehow more maintainable than Lauris can you? –  mocj Feb 16 '10 at 21:37
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I'd bet there's no difference in the compiled code. I'd at least try to make it a little more readable:

return n==0 ? 0 : ( n==1 ? 1 : fib(n-1) + fib(n+1) );
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1  
I'd try to make your answer more readable as well ;) –  Earlz Feb 16 '10 at 17:47
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As a generic rule, you should write readable code, which means code which is most readable by the people who will actually read it. Most of the time, this means "yourself, three weeks later". When you write code, the good question is then "will I be able to read and understand it again next month ?".

Apart from that, the first expression is buggy (it uses fib(n+1) instead of fib(n-2)) and both exhibit the exponential explosion which makes Fibonacci sequence a classical tool for teaching some important practical aspects of algorithmics.

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