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At the moment I'm building a recruitment platform. An employer can post a job and receive applications. The employer can set many skill requirements which a jobseeker has to match. The jobseeker can also add many skills which they posses.

What I'm trying to find out is how many of each jobseekers_skills match the employer_requirements for each job in order to display the percentile match in the view. I would ideally like to find the match based on skill_string which exists in both the jobseeker_skills table and employer_requirements table

Here is the database arrangement for each of the 3 tables:

applications:

id | job_string | jobseeker_string | employer_string | application_string | date_created

employer_requirements:

id | skill_name | requirement_level | skill_string | job_string | employer_string | date_created

jobseeker_skills:

id | skill_name | level | jobseeker_string | skill_string | string | date_created

I have the following code which gets all the applications based on the '$job_str' which is passed. The code below is just a simple get but unsure of where to go from here.

function skills_match($job_str){

    $this->db->select('*')
             ->from('applications')
             ->where('job_string', $job_str)
             ->join('users', 'users.string = applications.jobseeker_string', 'left');

    $applications = $this->db->get();

    return $applications;

}

Applications Table - Sample Data: +--------+------------------+------------------+------------------+ | id | job_string | jobseeker_string | employer_string | +--------+------------------+------------------+------------------+ | 1 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf | uMIsuDJaBuDmo8iq | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 2 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf | x7phHsVnwJ1K1yHy | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 3 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf | Fm1TIJLxz6Xg6QPk | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | +--------+------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+------+

Employer Requirements - Sample Data:

+--------+------------------+-------------+------------------+------------------+ | id | job_string | skill_name | skill_string | employer_string | +--------+------------------+-------------+------------------+-----------------+| | 1 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf |PHP | 9Y8XeCWqJXzkZ5dD | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 2 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf |JavaScript | O6es19t5CgcRHvct | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 3 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf |HTML | wx4evsXC62BWiN7p | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 4 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf |Python | jx15rH1vrGLmsVmq | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 5 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf |SQL | EksP7mEip0Hs4zKd | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | | 6 | vs71FVTBb12DdGlf |LESS | fj40m4hkiuDGtbzr | biQxyPekn6iayIgm | +--------+------------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+------+ Jobseeker Skills - Sample Data:

+--------+------------------+------------------+------------------+ | id | jobseeker_string | skill_name | skill_string | +--------+------------------+------------------+------------------+ | 1 | uMIsuDJaBuDmo8iq | PHP | 9Y8XeCWqJXzkZ5dD | | 2 | uMIsuDJaBuDmo8iq | Backbone | 4VIiAxZoL1VbPnTa | | 3 | x7phHsVnwJ1K1yHy | LESS | fj40m4hkiuDGtbzr | | 2 | x7phHsVnwJ1K1yHy | Ruby | gTZg4fwYuzMMFcBw | | 3 | x7phHsVnwJ1K1yHy | SQL | EksP7mEip0Hs4zKd | | 1 | Fm1TIJLxz6Xg6QPk | PHP | 9Y8XeCWqJXzkZ5dD | | 2 | Fm1TIJLxz6Xg6QPk | Python | jx15rH1vrGLmsVmq | | 3 | Fm1TIJLxz6Xg6QPk | HTML | wx4evsXC62BWiN7p | | 3 | Fm1TIJLxz6Xg6QPk | Git | aR9B9ns1sHlGrzFw | +--------+------------------+------+-----+---------+-------+------+

Based on the above the this should output either a percentage or the no. of matched skills:

Applications - Below is the number/percentage of matched skills for each application: uMIsuDJaBuDmo8iq - 1/6 (16.666%) x7phHsVnwJ1K1yHy - 2/6 (33.333%) Fm1TIJLxz6Xg6QPk - 3/6 (50%)

Any questions then please fire away. Thanks for your help in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Can you provide a few rows of sample data, and a few rows of desired results? – Ollie Jones Mar 31 '14 at 0:18
    
@OllieJones I've just made an edit with sample data and brief summary of expected results, if you need anything else please just ask. – learn Mar 31 '14 at 1:38
    
@OllieJones To make it clear I still want to get all applications for a particular job but just order_by the jobseekers with the best matched skills – learn Mar 31 '14 at 2:00
    
@OllieJones I'm curious whether you have any insight on this problem as I've been stuck for the last 2 days and getting nowhere – learn Mar 31 '14 at 19:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

First of all, these are 2 questions:

  1. Which of the applicants match my business the best
  2. Which of the employers match my skills the best.

The 2 questions might look the same, but they are not.

First question: I want all applicants which match any of my requirements, ordered by the amount of requirements i have. First i get all matches:

select *
from Requirements r 
inner join Jobseeker j
on r.skill_string = j.r.skill_string 
where job_string = 'vs71FVTBb12DdGlf';

Then i group em, count em etc:

select 
  jobseeker_string, 
  count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where job_string = 'vs71FVTBb12DdGlf') as match_percentage
from Requirements r 
inner join Jobseeker j
on r.skill_string = j.r.skill_string 
where job_string = 'vs71FVTBb12DdGlf'
group by jobseeker_string;

Second Question: Is a bit more difficult, as the applicant might want to know if he/she matches a certain percentage of the jobs skill, but also of his own skills (this might apply to the first question aswell). Query below:

select 
  job_string, 
  count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where jobseeker_string  = 'uMIsuDJaBuDmo8iq') as my_match,
  count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where job_string = r.job_string) as job_match
from Requirements r 
inner join Jobseeker j
on r.skill_string = j.r.skill_string 
where jobseeker_string = 'uMIsuDJaBuDmo8iq'
group by job_string;

Please note: query is written out of my head, it might contain some typos

if you want to order by, you could do it like this:

select * from
  ([[insert the above query here]]) t
order by field.

Combined:

select 
  job_string, 
  jobseeker_string
  count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where jobseeker_string  = r.jobseeker_string ) as seeker_match,
  count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where job_string = r.job_string) as job_match
from Requirements r 
inner join Jobseeker j
on r.skill_string = j.r.skill_string 
group by job_string, jobseeker_string;

Applicatons

select * from 
  (select 
    job_string, 
    jobseeker_string
    count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where jobseeker_string  = r.jobseeker_string ) as seeker_match,
    count(1) / (select count(1) from Requirements where job_string = r.job_string) as job_match
  from Requirements r 
  inner join Jobseeker j
  on r.skill_string = j.r.skill_string 
  group by job_string, jobseeker_string) t
inner join applications a
on t.job_string = a.job_string and t.jobseeker_string = a.t.jobseeker_string
share|improve this answer
    
First of all, I really appreciate you taking the time. Though, I don't think you understand the question. I have many applications and I want to be able to view all of these applications regardless whether they match or not. Foreach application I want to find out how many of the that jobseekers skills matches the employer_requirements for that specific job. – learn Mar 31 '14 at 9:41
    
Added a combined query, it returns a list of all jobseekers per job, and their respective match percentage. – Alfons Mar 31 '14 at 11:37
    
This still wouldn't work as you haven't taking into account the applications table where I actually find out who has applied for the job. From their I would get jobseeker_skills based on some sort of join between applications.jobseeker_string = jobseeker_skills.jobseeker_string and get employer_requirements with something like this applications.job_string = employer_requirements.job_string. So the applications table is important – learn Mar 31 '14 at 11:51
    
It would be great if you could have a look at the sample data above as I may be misleading you somewhere – learn Mar 31 '14 at 12:00
1  
I eventually realise that your method works so I'm gooing to give you the bounty. I just didn't engage my brain when looking at it initially. – learn Apr 15 '14 at 14:13

MySQL gives you a nice way to play with grouping, if and average. Have you ever played around with AVG(IF(..) ?

Say you have two tables with a couple of columns.

Something like this (sorry, sqlfiddle is out of work):

first_table:

id  category    element
1   number  two
2   number  three
3   number  four
4   number  five
5   number  eleven
6   fruit   banana
7   fruit   pineapple
8   fruit   pear
9   fruit   strawberry

second_table:

id  category    element
1   number  one
2   number  five
3   number  six
4   number  seven
5   number  three
6   fruit   apple
7   fruit   banana

1) You want to know how many elements of the first table can be found in the second:

    select count(*) as total
    from first_table t1 
    join second_table t2 
    on t1.element = t2.element

will return

 total
 3

2) With a left join, you may get valuable infor:

    select 
        count(*) as total, 
        count(t2.element) as number_matching
    from first_table t1
    left join second_table t2
    on t1.element = t2.element

This will land you with the total number of elements, and the number of elements matching. Divide, you have the percentage.

  total    number_matching
  9        3

3) With avg and if, we can get directly the proportion between 0 and 1:

    select
        AVG(IF(t2.element IS NULL, 0, 1)) as proportion_matching
    from first_table t1
    left join second_table t2
    on t1.element = t2.element

returns

proportion_matching
0.33333

4) Format as a percentage, round at your conveninence...

    select
        ROUND(AVG(IF(t2.element IS NULL, 0, 1)) * 100, 1) as percent_matching
    from first_table t1
    left join second_table t2
    on t1.element = t2.element

and you get

percent_matching
33.3

5) You can actually separate the results by categories.

    select
        t1.category,
        ROUND(AVG(IF(t2.element IS NULL, 0, 1)) * 100, 1) as percent_matching
    from first_table t1
    left join second_table t2
    on t1.element = t2.element
    group by t1.category

Remember this is actually "the percentage of element in table one that can be found in table 2"

category  percent_matching
fruit     25.0
number    40.0

6) Applying this to applications and skillsets... You would review a jobseeker applications as follow:

    SELECT
        a.job_string,
        ROUND(AVG(IF(jobseeker.skill_string IS NULL, 0, 1)) * 100, 1) as percent_matching
    FROM application a  
    JOIN employer_requirements er
    ON er.job_string = a.job_string
    LEFT JOIN jobseeker js
    ON a.jobseeker_string = js.jobseeker_string
    GROUP BY a.job_string

7) Of course, you can filter your job string in the where if you like. In fact, the join added here with the application table just makes sure you only get the results for jobs the user actually has applied for. But if you already have a job_string, you can get away with:

    SELECT
        er.job_string,
        ROUND(AVG(IF(jobseeker.skill_string IS NULL, 0, 1)) * 100, 1) as percent_matching
    FROM        employer_requirements er    
    LEFT JOIN   jobseeker js
    ON          js.jobseeker_string = er.jobseeker_string
    WHERE       er.jobseeker_string = ?

7) I leave it to you to throw this in an active-record-query (it's not the part I know the best ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I really appreciate you taking the time but I have been working with the original answer and found that it actually does work when I started playing around with it. I will take a lot of the stuff you have shown me and try to incorporate it into my work though, Again thanks for taking the time. – learn Apr 15 '14 at 14:12

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