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My got an error message "method_object.rb:8:in `': wrong argument type Fixnum (expected Proc) (TypeError)" when trying to run the following script

def f(x,y=2)
  x**y
end

a=method(:f).to_proc  
b=a.curry.curry[4]

print 1.upto(5).map(&b)    
puts

However, if function f is defined in the following way, everything was OK.

def f(x,y)
  x**y
end

Would any one help me with what went wrong with my first code?

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2 Answers 2

Proc#curry

Returns a curried proc. If the optional arity argument is given, it determines the number of arguments. A curried proc receives some arguments. If a sufficient number of arguments are supplied, it passes the supplied arguments to the original proc and returns the result. Otherwise, returns another curried proc that takes the rest of arguments.

Now coming to your code :

def f(x, y=2)
  x**y
end

a = method(:f).to_proc  
b = a.curry.curry[4]
b.class # => Fixnum
b # => 16
print 1.upto(5).map(&b) 
# wrong argument type Fixnum (expected Proc) (TypeError)

Look the documentation now - A curried proc receives some arguments. If a s*ufficient number* of arguments are supplied, it passes the supplied arguments to the original proc and returns the result.

In your code, when you did a.curry, it returns a curried proc. Why? Because your method f has one optional and one required argument, but you didn't provide any. Now you call again a.curry.curry[4], so on the previous curried proc which is still waiting for at-least one argument, this time you gave to it by using curry[4]. Now curried proc object gets called with 4, 2 as arguments, and evaluated to a Fixnum object 8 and assigned to b. b is not a proc object, rather a Fixnum object.

Now, 1.upto(5).map(&b) here - &b means, you are telling convert the proc object assgined to b to a block. But NO, b is not holding proc object, rather Fixnum object 8. So Ruby complains to you.

Here the message comes as wrong argument type Fixnum (expected Proc) (TypeError).

Now coming to your second part of code. Hold on!! :-)

Look below :

def f(x, y)
  x**y
end
a = method(:f).to_proc  
b = a.curry.curry[4]
b.class # => Proc
b # => #<Proc:0x87fbb6c (lambda)>
print 1.upto(5).map(&b) 
# >> [4, 16, 64, 256, 1024]

Now, your method f needs 2 mandatory argument x, y. a.curry, nothing you passed so a curried proc is returned. Again a.curry.curry[4], humm you passed one required argument, which is 4 out of 2. So again a curried proc returned.

Now 1.upto(5).map(&b), same as previous b expects a proc, and you fulfilled its need, as now b is proc object. &b converting it to a block as below :

1.upto(5).map { |num| b.call(num) }

which in turn outputs as - [4, 16, 64, 256, 1024].

Summary

Now suppose you defined a proc as below :

p = Proc.new { |x, y, z = 2| x + y + z }

Now you want to make p as curried proc. So you did p.curry. Remember you didn't pass any arity when called curry. Now point is a curried proc will wait to evaluate and return the result of x + y + z, unless and until, you are giving it all the required arguments it needs to produce it results.

That means p.curry gives you a curried proc object, then if you do p.curry[1] ( mean you are now passing value to x ), again you got a curried proc. Now when you will write p.curry[1][2], all required arguments you passed ( mean you are now passing value to y ), so now x + y + z will be called.

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Here's a related issue/feature request in the Ruby Bug Tracker: bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/4610 –  Patrick Oscity Mar 30 '14 at 22:26
    
@p11y Code is behaving as per the doc I can see... :-) –  Arup Rakshit Mar 30 '14 at 22:34
1  
Oh, now I have known where the error is. The optional argument 'y=2' makes b not a proc object! What a serious error! Thanks very much! –  user3477465 Mar 30 '14 at 22:38
    
@user3477465 just a small addition here towards you, you do not need to curry a two times, you can simply do it once like b = a.curry[4]. –  Alok Anand Mar 30 '14 at 23:10
1  
@ArupRakshit You are fast, +1. –  Alok Anand Mar 30 '14 at 23:11

You are using .map, it requires a block of type proc. In your first case b returns 16 as y=2 uses default value 2 for exponent when you are sending single argument using curry. b returning 16 is not a proc object and can not be used with .map.

Curry when used with a proc with sufficient arguments, it executes original proc and returns a result. Which is happening in OP's first case with curried proc passed with 4 as only argument and default y=2 in f(x, y=2) getting used and resulting in 16 as return value. 16 being Fixnum can not be used with enumerator map method.

Curry when used with insufficient arguments return a proc. So in case 2 when f(x, y) is used curried a is passed only single argument resulting in a proc object {|e| 4 ** e} being returned and which gets executed by map method.

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No not when you are sending single argument using curry.. curry will return a proc object. then curry[4] means you are calling Proc#[] or Proc#call or Proc#()...on the proc object returned by #curry. –  Arup Rakshit Mar 30 '14 at 22:42
    
@ArupRakshit Yes curry returns a proc object only when it is not supplied sufficient number of arguments otherwise curry executes the original proc and returns a result. In case 2, for f(x, y), x is 4 but y is not passed so a proc is returned by curry like Proc {|e| 4 ** e} –  Alok Anand Mar 30 '14 at 22:51
    
Yes, all I explained in my answer. I think I didn't left, still fixing typos there.. –  Arup Rakshit Mar 30 '14 at 22:53
    
@ArupRakshit I see Ruby Doc explained first. –  Alok Anand Mar 30 '14 at 22:55

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