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I'm trying to convert a Long into a List[Int] where each item in the list is a single digit of the original Long.

scala> val x: Long = 123412341L
x: Long = 123412341

scala> x.toString.split("").toList
res8: List[String] = List("", 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1)

scala> val desired = res8.filterNot(a => a == "")
desired: List[String] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1)

Using split("") results in a "" list element that I'd prefer not to have in the first place.

I could simply filter it, but is it possible for me to go from 123412341L to List(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1) more cleanly?

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I know Java has a String.toCharArray method - could you use that? – Boris the Spider Mar 30 '14 at 22:43
1  
That would not yield their integer values. For example, the first char in the array would be '1', which has integer value 49. – AmigoNico Mar 31 '14 at 1:16
up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you want the integer values of the digits, it can be done like so:

scala> x.toString.map(_.asDigit).toList
res65: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1)

Note the difference that the .map(_.asDigit) makes:

scala> x.toString.toList
res67: List[Char] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1)

scala> res67.map(_.toInt)
res68: List[Int] = List(49, 50, 51, 52, 49, 50, 51, 52, 49)

x.toString.toList is a List of Chars, i.e. List('1','2','3',...). The toString rendering of the list makes it look the same, but the two are quite different -- a '1' character, for example, has integer value 49. Which you should use depends on whether you want the digit characters or the integers they represent.

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I like this answer too. I wasn't aware of the asDigit method. So x.toString gets implicitly converted to a StringOps, which enables the use of map – Kevin Meredith Mar 31 '14 at 1:48

Quick and a bit hacky:

x.toString.map(_.toString.toInt).toList
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As pointed out below by Alexey, there are serious problems with this code :\ Don't use it.

Without using string conversion:

def splitDigits(n:Long): List[Int] = {
  n match {
    case 0 => List()
    case _ => {
      val onesDigit = (n%10)
      splitDigits((n-onesDigit)/10) ++ List( onesDigit.toInt )
    }
  }
}

Gives:

splitDigits(123456789)    //> res0: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
splitDigits(1234567890)   //> res1: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0)
splitDigits(12345678900L) //> res2: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, 0)

The function isn't tail-recursive, but it should work fine for Long values:

splitDigits(Long.MaxValue) //> res3: List[Int] = List(9, 2, 2, 3, 3, 7, 2, 0, 3, 6, 8, 5, 4, 7, 7, 5, 8, 0, 7)
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It's a bit worse than merely "not tail-recursive", appending lists to the end recursively results in a quadratic algorithm. It's fine when inputs are known to be limited like here, just something to be aware of. It also gives the wrong result for 0 :) – Alexey Romanov Mar 31 '14 at 19:00

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