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I ham having three classes in my program,

class A {
public:
  virtual ~A() {
    decompose();
  }
  virtual void decompose();
};

class B:public A {
private:
  int *b_data;
public:
  void decompose() {
    if (b_data != NULL) delete [] b_data;
  }
};

class C:public A {
private:
  int *c_data;

public:
  void decompose() {
    if (b_data != NULL) delete [] c_data;
  }
};

But when I compile this code with g++, I get the error:

In function `~A':
undefined reference to `vtable for A'
undefined reference to `A::decompose()'

In function `A':
undefined reference to `vtable for A'
undefined reference to `typeinfo for A'
undefined reference to `typeinfo for A'

If it helps, class A is defined in a .h file and it's destructor is defined inline, and two other classes have two files .h and .cpp.

In my program I call these classes according to the following:

int main() {
  A *a;
  a = new B();  //constructor is defined
  delete a;
  return 0;
}

Is there a problem with this code?

share|improve this question
    
how do you call A? –  AB_ Mar 30 at 22:42
    
Are you using g++ to compile? –  Matt McNabb Mar 30 at 22:44
    
I am using g++ and @lizusek I edited the question –  emab Mar 30 at 22:44
1  
Search for pure virtual functions –  K-ballo Mar 30 at 22:47
2  
@K-ballo That will not work because he is calling it in the destructor. –  Neil Kirk Mar 30 at 22:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The error is caused due to a call to A::decompose in B and C destructors. The A::decompose is called even if destructors are virtual and method is virtual itself. When A destructor is run for derived objects B or C, the derived part of the object was already destroyed.

class A {
public:
  virtual void decompose() { std::cout << "A";}
  virtual ~A() {
    decompose();
  }
};

class B:public A {
private:
  int *b_data;
public:
  void decompose() {
      std::cout << "B";
    if (b_data != NULL) delete [] b_data;
  }
};

class C:public A {
private:
  int *c_data;
public:
  void decompose() {
      std::cout << "C";
    if (c_data != NULL) delete [] c_data;
  }
  ~C() {}
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    B b;
    C c;
    return 0;
}

Output:

AA


Solution:

class A {
public:
  virtual void decompose() = 0;
  virtual ~A() {
      std::cout << "~A";
  }
};
class B:public A {
private:
  int *b_data;
public:
  void decompose() {
      std::cout << "B_decompose"; if (b_data != NULL) delete [] b_data;
  }
  ~B() { std::cout << "~B";}
};

class C:public A {
private:
  int *c_data;
public:
  void decompose() {
      std::cout << "C_decompose"; if (c_data != NULL) delete [] c_data;
  }
  ~C() { std::cout << "~C";}
};
   int main(int argc, char** argv) {
       B b;
       C c;
        A* p = &b;
        p->decompose();
        p = &c;
        p->decompose();
        return 0;
    }

compiled example

compiled example (solution)

share|improve this answer
    
But how can I call the destructor of B and C ? –  emab Mar 30 at 22:59
1  
@emab They are called. The problem is, calling decompose in ~A does not work properly. It just a rule of C++. You must work around it. –  Neil Kirk Mar 30 at 23:02
    
I can't use direct declarations of B and C, otherwise there was no problem and their destructor would be called immediately. –  emab Mar 30 at 23:16
    
@NeilKirk I got your point, is there any way to call the destructors of children? (They are not called in my example) –  emab Mar 30 at 23:35
    
@emab proper destructors are called by virtual dispatch, see my solution given in answer –  AB_ Mar 30 at 23:38

Be careful calling virtual functions in constructors and destructors. They are not overriden as normal. A(..) and ~A() ALWAYS call A::decompose. I think the compiler is complaining it cannot find this function.

share|improve this answer
1  
The Standard text for this is [class.cdtor]#4 "When a virtual function is called directly or indirectly from a constructor or from a destructor, including during the construction or destruction of the class’s non-static data members, and the object to which the call applies is the object (call it x) under construction or destruction, the function called is the final overrider in the constructor’s or destructor’s class and not one overriding it in a more-derived class." –  Matt McNabb Mar 30 at 23:09

Create an implementation of your A::decompose function in your base class

virtual void decompose(){};
share|improve this answer
    
If it's empty, then what's the point of defining it? I used this to clean my memory and delete data structures. –  emab Mar 30 at 22:49
    
Does it call the children's decompose either? –  emab Mar 30 at 22:51
    
@emab You specifically call it in your dtor, the compiler needs something!!! –  Vince Mar 30 at 22:51
2  
@emab The compiler doesn't know it's empty until you provide a definition that says "it's empty." There is no language rule that says "if a function is not implemented, then it defaults to empty." –  Raymond Chen Mar 30 at 22:52
2  
@emab you will have to actually add a destructor to B and C, and call decompose() from each. –  Matt McNabb Mar 30 at 23:11

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