Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It is fairly often suggested not to use raw pointers in modern C++, except for a few rare cases. What is the common practice of using smart pointers in C++ library APIs?

The following use cases come up to my mind:

  1. A function which returns a new object.
  2. A function which returns a new object, but it has also created another reference to this object.
  3. A function which only uses an object it receives as an argument.
  4. A function which takes over the ownership of an object.
  5. A function which will store a reference to an object which it has received as an argument, but there might be other references to the very same object (from the callers side).
share|improve this question
    
"5. A function [storing] a reference [...,] not care about potential other references." - this is vague. It doesn't care because it knows the object's lifetime will outlive its use? If so, it can take the address of a reference or accept a raw pointer. If it doesn't know that then it ultimately needs a weak pointer. –  Tony D Mar 31 at 7:20
    
What I meant was that either the object is immutable (i.e. sharing to reduce memory usage), or it is simply no problem, if the object is mutated through other aliases. –  Miklós Homolya Mar 31 at 7:28
    
I edited the question, I hope it's clearer now. –  Miklós Homolya Mar 31 at 7:29
    
5 now clearly suggests a std::shared_ptr<> as per Matthieu's answer, but the rewrite makes your "const std::shared_ptr<Foo>& / to prevent adjusting the reference count when the function is called and when it returns" bad advice, so I'm not sure if the question describes what you originally intended (but modifying it again would be unfair to Matthieu - if you have another distinct scenario of interest, add it at 6). –  Tony D Mar 31 at 8:12
    
Why is const-ref to shared pointer bad advice? With plain shared_ptr, reference count adjusted at: 1) function call; 2) when the function actually copies the reference for its own use; 3) function returns. With const-ref reference count is adjusted at 2) only. –  Miklós Homolya Mar 31 at 9:07

2 Answers 2

Unfortunately, a library API design goes far beyond the rule of the language itself: suddenly you have to care about implementations details such as the ABI.

Contrary to C, where common implementations can easily interact together, C++ implementations have very different ABIs (Microsoft ABI for VC++ is completely incompatible with the Itanium ABI used by gcc and Clang), and C++ Standard Library implementations are also incompatible with each others, so that a library compiled with libstdc++ (bundled with gcc) cannot be used by a program using another major version of libstdc++ or another implementation such as libc++ (bundled with Clang) if std:: classes appear in the interface.

Therefore, it really depends on whether you intend your library to be delivered as a binary or assume the user will be in a position to compile the library with its own compiler and Standard Library implementation of choice. Only in the latter case should you expose a C++ interface, for binary distributions sticking to C is better (and it's also easier to integrate with other languages).


With that out of the way, let's assume you decided to use a C++ API:

1) A function which returns a new object.

If the object can be returned by value, do so; if it is polymorphic, use std::unique_ptr<Object>.

2) A function which returns a new object, but it has also created another reference to this object.

Rare Case. I suppose that you mean it has kept a reference, somehow. In this case you have shared ownership so the obvious choice is std::shared_ptr<Object>.

3) A function which only uses an object it receives as an argument.

Much more complex than it first seems, even supposing no reference to the object is kept.

  • in general, pass by reference (const or not)
  • unless you intend to operate on a copy of the object, in which case pass by value to benefit from a potential move

4) A function which takes over the ownership of an object.

Simple ownership: std::unique_ptr<Object>.

5) A function which will store a reference to an object which it has received as an argument, but there might be other references to the very same object (from the callers side).

Shared ownership: std::shared_ptr<Object>

share|improve this answer
    
Note that a libraries C binary API can be wrapped in a header-only C++ API that gets compiled by the client. –  Yakk Mar 31 at 14:24
    
@Yakk: which starts getting interesting when, like for Clang, you have a core C++ implementation exposing a C API (for binary stability) and decide to wrap it in a header-only C++ API (for ease of use) :) –  Matthieu M. Mar 31 at 14:31
  1. Unique pointers may do the job in the general case.

    std::unique_ptr<Foo> func();
    

    So that you can assign them directly to auto variables at the callers site, and not worry about memory management.

    auto u = func();
    

    In case you need shared ownership, you can convert smart pointers on the callers site:

    std::shared_ptr<Foo> s{func()};
    

    However, in case the return type of the function is not polymorphic, and that type is fast to move, you may prefer return by value:

    Foo func();
    
  2. Shared pointers.

    std::shared_ptr<Foo> func();
    
  3. Simply use a reference or const reference to the object, with raw pointers or smart pointers "dereferenced" at the callers site.

    void func(Foo& obj);
    void func(const Foo& obj);
    

    In case the parameters are optional, you may use raw pointers, so that you can easily pass a nullptr to them.

    void func(Foo *obj);
    void func(const Foo *obj);
    
  4. Unique pointers.

    void func(std::unique_ptr<Foo> obj);
    
  5. Const reference to shared pointers.

    void func(const std::shared_ptr<Foo>& obj);
    

    The const reference (to shared pointer) is simply an optimization to prevent adjusting the reference count when the function is called and when it returns.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree - although #3 could also be plain raw pointers if a nullptr is a valid argument. Raw pointers as function arguments in modern C++ simply mean "can be null, but I won't accuire any ownership of what you give me." –  Arne Mertz Mar 31 at 7:13
1  
@ArneMertz The cost of moving only matters if there is no RVO. But in general "return a unique_ptr" should not be the default action. It should be used only if necessary. –  juanchopanza Mar 31 at 7:21
1  
Unless for some reason you want to keep track of the state of the shared_ptr (i.e. its ref count), I can't see any reason for #5. You should just store a reference to the actual object. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 31 at 7:37
1  
"4. A function which takes over the ownership of an object. / void func(std::unique_ptr<Foo> obj); - it's noteworthy that this argument type isn't enough to guarantee exception safety for multi-argument function calls - some manner of make_unique<> is also needed as explained in GOTW 102 –  Tony D Mar 31 at 7:38
2  
@MiklósHomolya I am not sure how the user could achieve that. Do you have an example in mind? Anyway, I still think returning by value should be the default case. –  juanchopanza Mar 31 at 7:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.