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I suppose some of you read the title, and went "oh, another question about java's 0-based month system...". Well, not this time.

After we switched to daylight savings time, my java calendar object behaves irradically. Setting the month to JUNE, actually sets it to July. I have no idea why, but someone suggested that I set the Locale - object in the calendar's constructor parameters. That did not work. The following code returns 01-07-14 in my console.

Any ideas?

public class test {

    public static void main(String[] args){
        Locale locale = new Locale("da-DK");
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yy");

        Calendar date = new GregorianCalendar(locale);
        date.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.JUNE);
        System.out.println(sdf.format(date.getTime()));
    }
}

UPDATE:

this also returns 01-07-14

public class test {

    public static void main(String[] args){
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yy");
        TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone("Europe/Copenhagen");

        Calendar date = new GregorianCalendar(timeZone);
        date.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.JUNE);
        System.out.println(sdf.format(date.getTime()));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
To properly handle DST, you need to tell the code which TimeZone to use. – nablex Mar 31 '14 at 7:38
    
By "switched to daylight savings time" do you mean the first time ever, or the regular occurrence at this time of year? – Gilbert Le Blanc Mar 31 '14 at 7:44
    
This is a regular occurrence every year, but it is the first time I have had a system that is affected by it. It was made less than half a year ago, so it is the first occurrence since then. – KjetilNordin Mar 31 '14 at 7:48
    
@nablex thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately it did not work. – KjetilNordin Mar 31 '14 at 7:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Today is the 31st of March. When you set the month of the Calendar, the current day remains set, but the 31st of June doesn't exist so the Calendar rolls over to the 1st of July.

share|improve this answer
    
YES! Of course! I should have known. How convenient that this happened just after we turned to daylight savings time, to confuse me more. Thank you very much! I'll make sure to set the day to 1, before doing anything with the month :) – KjetilNordin Mar 31 '14 at 7:57
2  
Beat me to the punch, date.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1); fixes it ;) – Gorbles Mar 31 '14 at 7:59
    
...and that is just what I have done now ;). Thanks guys. Really thanks. You saved me probably a couple of frustrating hours on this one. – KjetilNordin Mar 31 '14 at 8:04

You need to create your GregorianCalendar using the relevant Locale

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/GregorianCalendar.html#GregorianCalendar(java.util.Locale)

share|improve this answer
    
It did nothing. I will update and simplify my code now for further info. – KjetilNordin Mar 31 '14 at 7:37

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