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I have the following script which performs an 'infinite-scroll' style function:

    var next_page_link = $('.wp-pagenavi a:eq(-2)').attr('href'); 

    $(window).scroll(function() {
        if ($(window).scrollTop()  > $(document).height() / 2) {
            $.get(next_page_link, function(data){
                    if ($(data).find('.wp-pagenavi a:eq(-2)').attr('href') != next_page_link) {
                        next_page_link = $(data).find('.wp-pagenavi a:eq(-2)').attr('href');
                        var content = $(data).find('#multiple_product_top_container').html();
                        $('#multiple_product_top_container').append(content);
                    }
            });                 
        }
    });

The one problem I've encountered is that each time the $.get function runs, the browser would freeze for 2-3 seconds or more and only un-freeze when the next page has been completely loaded.

My question is, is it possible to set the $.get function to run asynchronously or some other method which will eliminate the freezing?

Btw, I know that it's possible to use a server side script but I've encountered a lot of conflicts and it's more complicated involving more parsing.

Thanks

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$.get is asynchronous must be a problem with your callback –  Wilmer Mar 31 at 9:01
    
Is your call to $.get debounced? Or can an impatient person trigger it over and over? –  Paul Mar 31 at 9:02
    
@Paul 'debounced'? I haven't encountered that before. Can you explain a little bit what it does? Thanks –  user2028856 Mar 31 at 9:03
    
Sometimes wrapping the code in a setTimeout(fn, 0); helps. It's actually used in many js libraries –  aurbano Mar 31 at 9:05
2  
The problem is probably with all the AJAX requests that are bombarding the server, as a new request is created for every scroll (check your network tab in Chrome to see what I mean). Add a condition that a new request can't happen until the old one finishes. –  eithedog Mar 31 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An answer to question from comment: How do I set it so that a new request can't happen until the old one finishes?

You use a semaphore:

var semaphore = true;
var next_page_link = $('.wp-pagenavi a:eq(-2)').attr('href'); 

$(window).scroll(function() {
    if ($(window).scrollTop()  > $(document).height() / 2 && semaphore) {
        semaphore = false;
        $.get(next_page_link, function(data){
            semaphore = true;
                if ($(data).find('.wp-pagenavi a:eq(-2)').attr('href') != next_page_link) {
                    next_page_link = $(data).find('.wp-pagenavi a:eq(-2)').attr('href');
                    var content = $(data).find('#multiple_product_top_container').html();
                    $('#multiple_product_top_container').append(content);
                }
        });                 
    }
});

It would be a good idea to add a condition, that no new requests are to be made when you've already retrieved all that's possible to retrieve.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a really nifty idea, works perfect! Thanks a lot! :D –  user2028856 Mar 31 at 9:42

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