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I've asked a question about buffer overflow detection few days ago ( sprintf buffer global data overflow - how to detect it, Windows ) and problem can by only solved by cppcheck with standard function ( not secure _s version ).

I went deeper and changed code from

#include <stdio.h>
char buffer[2];
void main()
{
  sprintf(buffer,"12345");
}

to

#include <stdio.h>
void f( char *b )
{
   sprintf(b,"12345");
}

char buffer[2];
void main()
{
   f( buffer );
}

Visual studio 2012 /RTC can handle stack allocated buffer overflow - during runtime, but global data stays undetected.

I guess it is not possible to make deep analysis using cppcheck and this problem is not detected by cppcheck-1.64. Additionally I have tried to use clang with AddressSanitizer ( Windows ) also without good results.

Is is possible to prevent such problems under Windows ( free tool preferably ), if not maybe some linux tool can help?

share|improve this question
    
Overall, I find it simpler to just not overrun the end of buffers. – Martin James Mar 31 '14 at 10:43
1  
Usually developers are not making bugs on purpose : ) – bataliero1234 Mar 31 '14 at 10:58

Instead of using sprintf, you should consider using snprintf. Its prototype is (contained in the header stdio.h) -

int snprintf(char *str, size_t size, const char *format, ...);

The function writes at most size bytes including the terminating null byte to the buffer pointed to by str. Therefore, you should change your function f signature to take the length of the buffer as well. Also, note that the signature of main should be one of the following -

int main(void);
int main(int argc, char *argv[]);

I suggest the following changes -

#include <stdio.h>

void f(char *b, size_t len) {
   sprintf(b, len, "12345");
}

char buffer[2];
int main(void) {
   f(buffer, sizeof buffer);
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

These are the some of reasons due to which we should avoid to global variable in our program. I do not think there are such tools exists which would report about the global variable(data segment) corruption. There is good set of tools available for detecting the stack and heap segment memory corruption/overrun.

So to avoid such scenario, we should use minimize the usage of global variable in our program. If it is not possible, we should try to use defensive programming approach by yourself while using these. Just to illustrate this your program can be re-written in the following way which would avoid the global memory corruption scenario in your program.

#include <cstdio>

char buffer[2];


void f( char *b, size_t sz)
{
 // Now we have protected our global variable from overrun by
 // using the size information passed by caller.So even though
 // client "12345" has been passed, it would just copy 12.
 strncpy(b,"12345",sz);
}


int main() {
  size_t tmp = sizeof(buffer)/sizeof(buffer[0]);
  f( buffer, tmp);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So there are no tools which is for example putting canaries/magicword between variables in data segment ( like stack overflow protection method )? I thougt AddressSanitizer will do such thing but yesterday I've tested it and failed detecting. code.google.com/p/address-sanitizer/wiki/… – bataliero1234 Mar 31 '14 at 11:19
    
@bataliero1234: There could be the tools and even AddressSanitizer may work. There would be some technical limitations while dealing with global(data) segment.However the point is if possible we should make our program more robust and secure(if possible) and be less dependent on the tool. This is important point to be noted as in real world most of the time your software would experience some problem which you would not able to reproduce it in our own environment. And customer would not(normally) allow you to run any dynamic tool on their production machines. So choice is ours :) – Mantosh Kumar Mar 31 '14 at 11:58

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