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I have a question regarding performance of Sql Server.

Suppose I have a table persons with the following columns: (id, name, surname).

Now, I want to insert a new row in this table. The rule is the following:

  1. If id is not present in the table, then insert the row

  2. If d is present, then update.

I have two solutions here:

First:

update persons
  set id=@p_id, name=@p_name, surname=@p_surname
where id=@p_id
if @@ROWCOUNT = 0 
  insert into persons(id, name, surname)
  values (@p_id, @p_name, @p_surname)

Second:

if exists (select id from persons where id = @p_id)
  update persons
    set id=@p_id, name=@p_name, surname=@p_surname
  where id=@p_id
else
  insert into persons(id, name, surname)
  values (@p_id, @p_name, @p_surname)

What is a better aproach? It seems like in the second choice, to update a row, it has to be searched 2 times, whereas in the first option - just ones. Are there any other solutions to the problem? I am using MS SQL 2000

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not sure, but I would just do a if ((COUNT(*) ) > 0) then update for the second option –  Patrick Kafka Feb 16 '10 at 20:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both work fine, but I usually use option 2 (pre-mssql 2008) since it reads a bit more clearly. I wouldn't stress about the performance here either...If it becomes an issue, you can use NOLOCK in the exists clause. Though before you start using NOLOCK everywhere, make sure you've covered all your bases (indexes and big picture architecture stuff). If you know you will be updating every item more than once, then it might pay to consider option 1.

Option 3 is to not use destructive updates. It takes more work, but basically you insert a new row every time the data changes (never update or delete from the table) and have a view that selects all the most recent rows. It's useful if you want the table to contain a history of all its previous states, but it can also be overkill.

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Option 1 seems good. However, if you're on SQL Server 2008, you could also use MERGE, which may perform good for such UPSERT tasks.

Note that you may want to use an explicit transaction and the XACT_ABORT option for such tasks, so that the transaction consistency remains in the case of a problem or concurrent change.

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I tend to use option 1. If there is record in a table, you save one search. If there isn't, you don't loose anything. Moreover, in the second option you may run into funny locking and deadlocking issues related to locks incompatibility. There's some more info on my blog:

http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/piotr_rodak/archive/2010/01/04/updlock-holdlock-and-deadlocks.aspx

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