Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I parse and evaluate a mathematical expression in a string (e.g. '1+1') without invoking eval(string) to yield its numerical value?

With that example, I want the function to accept '1+1' and return 2.

share|improve this question
    
AFAIK no. That's what eval() is for, but I suppose you want a secure solution... –  Tronic Feb 16 '10 at 20:20
2  
Very similar but it’s probably not what you’re asking for: (Function("return 1+1;"))(). –  Gumbo Feb 16 '10 at 20:20

7 Answers 7

Somebody has to parse that string. If it's not the interpreter (via eval) then it'll need to be you, writing a parsing routine to extract numbers, operators, and anything else you want to support in a mathematical expression.

So, no, there isn't any (simple) way without eval. If you're concerned about security (because the input you're parsing isn't from a source you control), maybe you can check the input's format (via a whitelist regex filter) before passing it to eval?

share|improve this answer
    
It's not security that bothers me ( I already have a regexp for the job), it's more the load on the browser as I have to process a lot of strings like this. Could a custom parser feasibly be faster than eval()? –  wheresrhys Feb 16 '10 at 20:24
5  
@wheresrhys: Why would you think your parser, written in JS, is going to be faster than the system provided one (optimized, probably written in C or C++)? –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 16 '10 at 20:41
    
eval is by far the fastest way to do this. However, a regexp is generally not sufficient to ensure security. –  levik Feb 16 '10 at 20:44
    
@wheresrhys: Why do you have a lot of strings like this? Are they being generated by a program? If so, the simplest way is to calculate the result before they are converted to strings. Otherwise, it's write-your-own-parser time. –  Phil H May 2 '12 at 12:58

// You can do + or - easily:

function addbits(s){
    var total= 0, s= s.match(/[+\-]*(\.\d+|\d+(\.\d+)?)/g) || [];
    while(s.length){
        total+= parseFloat(s.shift());
    }
    return total;
}

var string='1+23+4+5-30';
addbits(string)

More complicated math makes eval more attractive- and certainly simpler to write.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Probably a bit more general than what I went with, but it won't work for my situation as I may have something like 1+-2, and I want the regex to exclude invalid statements too (I think yours would allow something like "+3+4+") –  wheresrhys Mar 6 '10 at 12:02
    
Man!... This Saved me about 10Kilograms of heavy Google Search... Brilliant! –  ErickBest Jan 30 at 13:54

You can use the JavaScript Expression Evaluator library, which allows you to do stuff like:

Parser.evaluate("2 ^ x", { x: 3 });

Or mathjs, which allows stuff like:

math.eval('sin(45 deg) ^ 2');

I ended up choosing mathjs for one of my projects.

share|improve this answer

I've recently done this in C# (no Eval() for us...) by evaluating the expression in Reverse Polish Notation (that's the easy bit). The hard part is actually parsing ths string and turning it into Reverse Polish Notation. I used the Shunting Yard algorithm as there's a great example on Wikipedia and pseudocode. I found it really simple to implement both and I'd recommend that if you've not already found a solution or are looking at alternatives.

share|improve this answer

This is a little function I threw together just now to solve this issue - it builds the expression by analyzing the string one character at a time (it's actually pretty quick though). This will take any mathematical expression (limited to +,-,*,/ operators only) and return the result. It can handle negative values and unlimited number operations as well.

The only "to do" left is to make sure it calculates * & / before + & -. Will add that functionality later, but for now this does what I need...

/**
* Evaluate a mathematical expression (as a string) and return the result
* @param {String} expr A mathematical expression
* @returns {Decimal} Result of the mathematical expression
* @example
*    // Returns -81.4600
*    expr("10.04+9.5-1+-100");
*/ 
function expr (expr) {

    var chars = expr.split("");
    var n = [], op = [], index = 0, oplast = true;

    n[index] = "";

    // Parse the expression
    for (var c = 0; c < chars.length; c++) {

        if (isNaN(parseInt(chars[c])) && chars[c] !== "." && !oplast) {
            op[index] = chars[c];
            index++;
            n[index] = "";
            oplast = true;
        } else {
            n[index] += chars[c];
            oplast = false;
        }
    }

    // Calculate the expression
    expr = parseFloat(n[0]);
    for (var o = 0; o < op.length; o++) {
        var num = parseFloat(n[o + 1]);
        switch (op[o]) {
            case "+":
                expr = expr + num;
                break;
            case "-":
                expr = expr - num;
                break;
            case "*":
                expr = expr * num;
                break;
            case "/":
                expr = expr / num;
                break;
        }
    }

    return expr;
}
share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've eventually gone for this solution, which works for summing positive and negative integers (and with a little modification to the regex will work for decimals too):

function sum(string) {
  return (string.match(/^(-?\d+)(\+-?\d+)*$/)) ? string.split('+').stringSum() : NaN;
}   

Array.prototype.stringSum = function() {
    var sum = 0;
    for(var k=0, kl=this.length;k<kl;k++)
    {
        sum += +this[k];
    }
    return sum;
}

I'm not sure if it's faster than eval(), but as I have to carry out the operation lots of times I'm far more comfortable runing this script than creating loads of instances of the javascript compiler

share|improve this answer
1  
Although return cannot be used inside an expression, sum("+1") returns NaN. –  Gumbo Mar 6 '10 at 11:54
    
Always foregt whether return has to or can't go inside a ternary expression. I'd like to exclude "+1" because although it 'should' evaluate as a number, it's not really an example of a mathematical sum in the everyday sense. My code is designed to both evaluate and filter for allowable strings. –  wheresrhys Mar 6 '10 at 12:12

I went looking for JavaScript libraries for evaluating mathematical expressions, and found these two promising candidates:

  • JavaScript Expression Evaluator: Smaller and hopefully more light-weight. Allows algebraic expressions, substitutions and a number of functions.

  • mathjs: Allows complex numbers, matrices and units as well. Built to be used by both in-browser JavaScript and Node.js.

share|improve this answer
    
I've now tested the JavaScript Expression Evaluator, and it seems to rock. (mathjs probably rocks too, but it seems a bit too big for my purposes and I also like the substitution functionality in JSEE.) –  Itangalo Feb 12 at 13:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.