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#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <windows.h>

using namespace std;

void addRecordstoFile();
void readRecordsFromFile();

int main(){


    addRecordstoFile();
    readRecordsFromFile();
}

void addRecordstoFile(){

This adds the integers to the file but I want when it exits (when the user enters -1) not be displayed in the .txt file

    int num=1;
    char response;

    ofstream outFile("numbers.txt",ios::out);

    if (!outFile){
        cerr<<"File was not opened correctly"<<endl;
        exit(1);
    }

    cout<<"\t\t\tSurvey Response Analyzer"<<endl;


    while(num!=-1){

            cout<<"\n Enter a survey response from 1 to 10 (-1 to end): ";
            cin>>num;


            if(num<1 || num>10){
                cout<<"\n Please enter a valid response from (1-10): ";
                cin >>num;

            }

            outFile << num <<" ";

    }

            outFile.close();
            cout<<"Saved to file..."<<endl;
            system("pause");
}

This is where the major problem lies, I should extract the integers from the text file and place them in an array of counters to count the number of times the user enterred a number between 1 and 10. I am completely lost because I would need the size of the array to determine my loop.

    void readRecordsFromFile(){

    ifstream inFile("numbers.txt",ios::in);

    if(!inFile){
        cerr<<"File was not found";
        exit (1);
    }

How can I make an array of counters here without knowing the definite size of the array from the text file?

}
share|improve this question
    
Use a dynamic collection like std::vector –  OldProgrammer Mar 31 '14 at 14:35
    
As OldProgrammer said, you can use a vector and push_back() characters as you extract them. –  0x499602D2 Mar 31 '14 at 14:49

4 Answers 4

1. First query:

This adds the integers to the file but I want when it exits (when the user enters -1) not be displayed in the .txt file

Replace

if (num < 1 || num > 10) {
    cout<<"\n Please enter a valid response from (1-10): ";
    cin >>num;
}
outFile << num <<" ";

with

if (num < 1 || num > 10) {
    cout<<"\n Please enter a valid response from (1-10): ";
    cin >>num;
} else {
    outFile << num <<" ";
}

2. Second query:

I would need the size of the array to determine my loop

No you don't. You may use a while loop to check the end.

share|improve this answer

1st thing first, in your void addRecordstoFile() function, you could design your while loop as,

while(num!=-1){

        cout<<"\n Enter a survey response from 1 to 10 (-1 to end): ";
        cin>>num;

        if(num<1 || num>10){
            cout<<"\n Please enter a valid response from (1-10) ";
        }
        else{
            outFile << num <<" ";
        }

}

Next, for your void readRecordsFromFile() function, if your ultimate goal is only to count the number of appearances of the numbers entered, then you could use a 10 element counter array. and while reading from the file any digit you got, you just increase the element at the particular index of the counter array. say, you read 3 from the file, so you will just increase counter[3] as counter[3]++ to count the appearance of 3 in the file. Think about it.

while(/*end of file condition*/){
    int a;
    inFile>>a;
    counter[a]++;
}

Hope it helped...

share|improve this answer

Well, the good news is you have tons of options to fix your issues. Here are some suggestions:

In order to avoid having the '-1' in the .txt file, I might change your loop to look like this:

while(num!=-1){

        cout<<"\n Enter a survey response from 1 to 10 (-1 to end): ";
        cin>>num;

        if (num == -1) break;  //  will break out of loop before adding num!
        if (num>0 && num<=10) outFile << num <<" ";  //  add only a valid number
        //  Note:  if number is not 1 thru 10 or -1, loop simply repeats!
}

As for your second function, you have a variety of options, but I would suggest using a vector to contain the numbers. To use vectors, you need the library:

  #include <vector>

Vectors are dynamic arrays -- you can add or delete elements to them as you wish. Your function might look like this:

void readRecordsFromFile(){
ifstream inFile("numbers.txt",ios::in);
if(!inFile){
    cerr<<"File was not found";
    exit (1);
}

vector <int> vNums;  //  a container for your int values
int inNum;           //  hold int for loading into vector

//  Read each number to inNum, then add it to the vector
while (!inFile.eof()) {
    inFile >> inNum;         //  load your input
    vNums.push_back(inNum);  //  "push_back" adds an element
}

//  Output the numbers... you may want to use a vector iterator for this
int x = 0;
while (x < vNums.size() ) {
    cout << x+1 << " - " << vNums[x] << "\n";
    x++;
}

}

Another option would be to use dynamic memory (new / delete), with linked lists. Here's a tutorial: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/lesson15.html

I think using a vector is a better solution, though! Best of luck.

share|improve this answer
return static_cast<double>(numerator/denominator);

Probably you prefer to cast each variable to double first and divide later. This is the difference:

  • If int: 2/4 == 0, so that static_cast<double>(numerator/denominator) returns 0.
  • If double (or float): 2./4. == 0.5, so that static_cast<double>(numerator) / static_cast<double>(denominator) returns 0.5.
share|improve this answer

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