Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
class uid
{

public:

    char id[6] = {'0','0','0','0','0','0'};

    uid() {}
    ~uid() {}

    inline void recursive(int x)
    {
        if(':' == id[x])
        {
            id[x] = '0';
            ++id[--x];
            recursive(x);
        }
    }

    char* operator++()
    {
        ++id[5];
        recursive(5);

        return id;
    }

    void write(char* pchar) const
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++i)
            pchar[i] = id[i];
    }   
};

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{   

    const int MAX = 5000000;

    uid c;
    char** arr = new char*[MAX];

    //char** it = arr;

    //loop 1
    for(int i = 0; i < MAX; ++i)
        arr[i] = new char[6];           

    cout << "allocated" << endl;


    //loop 2    
    for(int i = 0; i < MAX; ++i)
    {
        ++c;        
        c.write(arr[i]);
    }   

    cout << "data written" << endl;

    for(int i = 0; i < MAX; ++i) 
        delete[] arr[i];

    cout << "deleting arr" << endl;

    delete[] arr;   

    return 0;   
}

Running this will cause a seg fault in loop 2 when i == 999999 -- However, when adding the line:

char** it = arr;

The seg fault disappears -- does anyone have any ideas of why this happens?

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Undefined behavior is by definition undefined. Anything can happen, including appearing to work. – Mark Ransom Mar 31 '14 at 16:25
    
If you can't find the undefined behaviour: What exactly happens on the one millionth call to the ++ operator? – gnasher729 Mar 31 '14 at 16:29
    
@gnasher729, the index in recursive goes negative. – Mark Ransom Mar 31 '14 at 16:30
    
All you did when you added that line is that you moved the potential segmentation fault to another part of the program. You didn't really eliminate it at all. – PaulMcKenzie Mar 31 '14 at 16:31
    
the one millionth call to the ++operator will change id[6] from {'9','9','9','9','9','9'} to {'0','0','0','0','0',0'} @gnasher729 – user3481813 Mar 31 '14 at 16:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As soon as you go past 999,999 you are writing to memory not owned by c. Declaring it changes the memory map enough that there is no immediate segfault, but the code is still not correct, and any other small change might bring back the fault.

share|improve this answer
    
doesn't the command: char** arr = new char*[5000000]; allow me to write to 0-4,999,999 ? – user3481813 Mar 31 '14 at 16:31
1  
Your MAX is five million. It takes seven digits to represent numbers that big, but your uid structure and your inner char arrays have only six slots. – Andrew Medico Mar 31 '14 at 16:37

Here's how to fix it:

inline void recursive(int x)
{
    if(':' == id[x])
    {
        id[x] = '0';
        if (x) { // <-- added this
            ++id[--x];
            recursive(x);
        }
    }
}

Now overflow will wrap around to 000000 instead of creating a 7 digit number in a space not big enough to hold it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Ben Voigit -- that did the trick! – user3481813 Mar 31 '14 at 16:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.