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I need a SQL query that will identify seasonal sales items.

My table has the following structure -

ProdId    WeekEnd     Sales
234       23/04/09    543.23
234       30/04/09     12.43
432       23/04/09      0.00
etc

I need a SQL query that will return all ProdId's that have 26 weeks consecutive 0 sales. I am running SQL server 2005. Many thanks!

Update: A colleague has suggested a solution using rank() - I'm looking at it now...

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1  
All items have a period of 26 weeks with 0 sales: the 26 weeks before your company started selling anything. You need to restrict the date ranges to some start and stop date for this query to even make sense. So having established that, my question is: is the start and stop date always exactly 26 weeks apart or can it be more? Are they specified as part of the query? –  Mark Byers Feb 16 '10 at 22:14
    
Yes, there needs to be sales data either side of the 26 week period, I should have made that plain. Now that I think about it a bit more, we probably want it to be between 26 and 30 weeks without sales. But if I can get a query that runs for exactly 26 weeks, I'm happy to execute it with changed parameters for 27,28,29,30 weeks as well... –  Craig Schwarze Feb 16 '10 at 22:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my version:

DECLARE @NumWeeks int
SET @NumWeeks = 26

SELECT s1.ProdID, s1.WeekEnd, COUNT(*) AS ZeroCount
FROM Sales s1
INNER JOIN Sales s2
    ON s2.ProdID = s1.ProdID
    AND s2.WeekEnd >= s1.WeekEnd
    AND s2.WeekEnd <= DATEADD(WEEK, @NumWeeks + 1, s1.WeekEnd)
WHERE s1.Sales > 0
GROUP BY s1.ProdID, s1.WeekEnd
HAVING COUNT(*) >= @NumWeeks

Now, this is making a critical assumption, namely that there are no duplicate entries (only 1 per product per week) and that new data is actually entered every week. With these assumptions taken into account, if we look at the 27 weeks after a non-zero sales week and find that there were 26 total weeks with zero sales, then we can deduce logically that they had to be 26 consecutive weeks.

Note that this will ignore products that had zero sales from the start; there has to be a non-zero week to anchor it. If you want to include products that had no sales since the beginning, then add the following line after `WHERE s1.Sales > 0':

OR s1.WeekEnd = (SELECT MIN(WeekEnd) FROM Sales WHERE ProdID = s1.ProdID)

This will slow the query down a lot but guarantees that the first week of "recorded" sales will always be taken into account.

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SELECT DISTINCT
  s1.ProdId
FROM (
    SELECT
      ProdId,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY ProdId ORDER BY WeekEnd) AS rownum,
      WeekEnd
    FROM Sales
    WHERE Sales <> 0
) s1
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT
      ProdId,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY ProdId ORDER BY WeekEnd) AS rownum,
      WeekEnd
    FROM Sales
    WHERE Sales <> 0
) s2
ON s1.ProdId = s2.ProdId
AND s1.rownum + 1 = s2.rownum
AND DateAdd(WEEK, 26, s1.WeekEnd) = s2.WeekEnd;
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1  
This is only going to compare the sales for exactly the 26th week afterward; the OP wants all 26 consecutive weeks to be 0. –  Aaronaught Feb 16 '10 at 23:18
    
Thanks. Query modified. –  lins314159 Feb 16 '10 at 23:29
    
This doesn't really change anything. It's still comparing one record in the first subquery to one record in the second subquery. It will find any two entries for any product that are exactly 26 weeks apart where neither one has zero sales; it's not even close to what the question asks. Actually, this version probably won't return any results because the question implies that successive entries are always 1 week apart, and this expects them to be 26 weeks apart. –  Aaronaught Feb 16 '10 at 23:49
    
ROW_NUMBER is applied after the WHERE clause, so if the first sale is in January with zero sales in all weeks until July, the row number for the July record will be 1 + that for January. –  lins314159 Feb 17 '10 at 0:39

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